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Old 06-11-2024, 09:55 AM
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Emily Bett Rickards Celebration Thread #43

Celebration stuff goes here!

And cheering up stuff









Celebrations

January 18th : Winnie the Pooh Day
January 21st : Hugging Day
February 11th: International Day of Women & Girls in Science Day
February 26th : Pistachio Day
March 5th : Pancake Day
March 16th : Panda Day
April 9th: Unicorn Day
May 3rd : Clem's Birthday
May 30th : World Otter Day
June 9th: Kate's birthday
July 21st : Ice-Cream Day
July 24th : Emily Bett Rickards' Birthday
August 13th : Left Handers Day
September 12th : Slap an Idiot I Know Day
September 16th : Oxalys' Birthday
October 14th : Dessert Day
November 17th : David Ramsey's Birthday
November 20th : Dbn's Birthday
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Old 06-11-2024, 09:58 AM
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Jcques Cousteau, an underwater explorer noted for his contributions to marine science and conservation, is celebrated today, on the anniversary of his birth. The Office of National Marine Sanctuaries (ONMS) started an official Cousteau Day, which was held on June 25, 2010, on the thirteenth anniversary of his death. At sanctuaries across the country, it was celebrated with events such as the cleaning up harbors and beaches, the reading of his books and watching of his films, events at aquariums, and events focusing on underwater exploration and the impact of humans on the marine environment. The day was also marked by the wearing of red hats—Cousteau's signature attire. There is no indication that the day officially took place on this date in subsequent years. Prior to, during, and following the ONMS Cousteau Day, the day has been unofficially celebrated on June 11, the date on which he was born in 1910.

Cousteau was not a trained scientist but became involved in underwater exploration because of his love of underwater diving and the ocean. He was a French naval officer during World War II, and began experimenting with underwater filmmaking at that time, and continued underseas investigation and research afterward. Throughout his work, he educated the public and sparked their interest in sea life and its preservation. He was an ecologist who participated in environmental activism, a photographer, a filmmaker who produced over 120 documentaries, and an author who wrote over 50 books. Most notably, he published Le Munde du silence (The Silent World) in 1953. It was made into a film in 1956 and won the Palme d'Or at Cannes, and the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature, the following year. He also created a documentary television program, The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau.

Cousteau lent his hand to various inventions as well. In 1943, he co-invented the Aqua-Lung, also known as the Self-Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus (SCUBA). This led to easier underwater exploration, and to people being able to see the wonders of the underworld up close for the first time. He helped invent the Diving saucer, an early vehicle for underwater exploration, and helped create the turbosail, which became used in Cousteau's ship, the Alcyone. He also helped invent some underwater cameras.

In 1950, Cousteau retrofitted a minesweeper into a new ship and named it Calypso. He used it for research for the remainder of his life. John Denver wrote a song of the same name devoted to Cousteau, the ship, and its crew. Cousteau was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1985. Formed in 1974 by Cousteau, the Cousteau Society continues his work today, focusing on the preservation of ocean life.

A traditional Neapolitan Margherita pizza recipe is tomato sauce with fresh tomatoes, mozzarella cheese and basil which represent the colours of the Italian flag – white cheese, green basil and red tomato.



King Kamehameha Day is a public holiday in Hawaiʻi that honors Kamehameha I, the Hawaiian king who was also known as Kamehameha the Great and the Napoleon of the Pacific. Kamehameha is known for establishing the unified Kingdom of Hawaiʻi in 1810, which brought together the islands of Niʻihau, Kauaʻi, Oʻahu, Molokaʻi, Lānaʻi, Kahoʻolawe, Maui, and Hawaiʻi. He was monarch of Hawaiʻi from 1782 until his death on May 8, 1819. The holiday was proclaimed by Kamehameha's grandson, Kamehameha V, on December 22, 1871; it was first observed the following year. After Hawaiʻi became a state in 1959, the holiday was proclaimed by its governor and legislature as well.

Celebrations at the time of the day's creation consisted of fairs, carnivals, and races on foot, horse, and velocipede. Presently, the day nods to the ancient Hawaiian traditions that Kamehameha fought to preserve as his land was being influenced by European culture. Each year, the Kamehameha Hula Competition takes place, where hula groups come to the Neal S. Blaisdell Center in Honolulu from all over the world. Floral parades take place in different locations throughout Hawaiʻi. One of the biggest is on Oʻahu, where it begins at 'Iolani Palace and ends in Kapiʻolani Park, where a party with food, music, and cultural exhibitions then takes place. Three floral parades are held on the island of Hawaiʻi alone. Festivals are held on many of the islands, and many schools and businesses are closed.

Beginning in 1901, the Kamehameha statue in Honolulu started being draped with lei on the day each year. Today, lei-draping ceremonies take place at the other five Kamehameha statues as well. The statue in Honolulu was dedicated in 1883; it was a re-cast of the original statue, which had been lost at sea. Earlier that year, the original statue was lost when the ship that was carrying it sank near the Falkland Islands while on its way to Hawaiʻi. It was found by Falkland Islanders and is now in North Kohala on the island of Hawaiʻi. A duplicate is located in Emancipation Hall in the United States Capitol Visitor Center in Washington D.C. This statue was commissioned when Hawaiʻi became a state in 1959 and was brought to the Capitol in 1969. Originally placed in Statuary Hall, it was moved to Emancipation Hall after Barack Obama was nominated as president. There are also duplicate statues in Hilo, on the island of Hawaiʻi; at the Grand Wailea resort on Maui; and at the Las Vegas Hawaiian Marketplace.

German chocolate cake — the fudge-y, nutty, and oh-so-sweet dessert that we all thought was German! The treat is defined by its rich chocolate cake layers, which are stuck together with coconut-pecan frosting and often topped with maraschino cherries. While many Americans think German chocolate originates from Germany, you’d be hard-pressed to find a German who knows of it.

Sam German, an English-American chocolate-maker for The Baker’s Chocolate Company, first created his distinct variety of dark baking chocolate in 1852. In his honor, the Baker’s Chocolate Company named the creation after him, dubbing it ‘Baker’s German’s Sweet Chocolate.’ This sets the stage for the culinary invention of German chocolate cake, and explains the origin misnomer!

German chocolate cake wasn’t actually born until around a century later, in 1957. In Dallas, Texas, housewife Mrs. George Clay sent in her cake recipe to be featured as ‘Recipe of the Day’ on “The Dallas Morning News.” She had called it ‘German’s Chocolate Cake’ after the baking chocolate she used. Over time, however, the ‘s’ has been dropped from the recipe.

Unsurprisingly, the recipe took off, spreading mostly through word of mouth. Sales of Baker’s Chocolate reportedly increased 73% in a year as bakers scrambled to make more German chocolate cake. The owner of Baker’s brand, General Foods, began to distribute the cake recipe to other bakers nationwide. Today, many baking companies still make the decadent dessert!
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Old 06-11-2024, 01:21 PM
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Thanks for the new!


I watched his shows when I was a kid!

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Old 06-12-2024, 05:31 AM
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Today:
Magic Day
Loving Day
Red Rose Day
Superman Day
Women Veterans Day
International Falafel Day
National Peanut Butter Cookie Day
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Old 06-12-2024, 09:04 AM
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I watched his shows when I was a kid!
Me too!


Thank you Kate







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Old 06-12-2024, 10:06 AM
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Magic Day is a day to celebrate the illusion and art of Magic. Magic is an art that has been around for centuries. It is a way to entertain and amaze people with illusions and sleight of hand.




Today marks the anniversary of the 1967 United States Supreme Court decision Loving v. Virginia, which invalidated anti-miscegenation laws, which are laws that ban interracial marriage. Sixteen states had such laws on the books at the time. These laws not only banned marriage between those who were black and white but sometimes banned marriage between other races as well. Loving Day commemorates and celebrates the Supreme Court decision, and highlights its importance to a generation of people who have grown up with interracial marriage being legal. The day also looks at issues that interracial couples still face today.

Anti-miscegenation laws go back to colonial times, and all but nine states had such laws on the books at some point. Loving v. Virginia wasn't the first instance when anti-miscegenation laws had been challenged. One notable example took place in 1883, when Pace v. Alabama ruled that anti-miscegenation laws were Constitutional because both blacks and whites were punished equally. Five years later, another ruling said that states had the right to regulate marriage. The Virginia anti-miscegenation law that Loving v. Virginia dealt with, the Act to Preserve Racial Integrity, was passed in 1924, and those who violated it could face between 1 and 5 years in the federal penitentiary.

The Supreme Court case was named for Richard and Mildred Loving. Richard, who was white, and Mildred, who was of African American and Native American descent, were from Central Point, Virginia, about an hour's drive north of Richmond. In June of 1958, they married in Washington, D.C., where interracial marriage was legal. They then returned to their hometown.

A few weeks later, around 2:00 a.m. on July 11, they were awoken in their beds and arrested by the local sheriff. They were indicted and charged with a felony. After pleading guilty to "cohabiting as man and wife, against the peace and dignity of the Commonwealth," they were sentenced to one year in prison by Judge Leon M. Bazile. However, they were allowed to avoid jail time on the condition that they would leave Virginia and wouldn't return for 25 years. They settled in Washington, D.C., where they raised three children—but they longed to return to Central Point.

In 1963, Mildred wrote to Robert F. Kennedy, who was Attorney General at the time. Kennedy referred the case to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), and they agreed to take it. ACLU lawyers Bernard Cohen and Philip Hirschkop were assigned to the case, and they did not charge for their services. With the lawyers' assistance, the Lovings filed a motion asking Judge Bazile to do away with the conviction and sentencing of their case. Bazile declined.

The lawyers took the case to the Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals, where the original ruling was upheld. The case eventually made its way to the United States Supreme Court, where a unanimous decision ruled that anti-miscegenation laws were unconstitutional under the Fourteenth Amendment, the amendment which guarantees due process and equal protection under the law to all citizens. Chief Justice Earl Warren wrote in the ruling, "Under our Constitution, the freedom to marry, or not to marry, a person of another race resides with the individual, and cannot be infringed by the state."

The case not only allowed Mildred and Richard to marry and struck down their criminal convictions, but it also negated the anti-miscegenation laws in the 16 states where they still remained. Although some states didn't change their laws, it didn't matter, because the court decision superseded any state laws. For example, Alabama had anti-miscegenation laws on their books until 2000, but because of Loving v. Virginia, it was illegal for them to enforce their law. Loving v. Virginia was a landmark moment of the civil rights era, and built on such successes as Brown v. Board of Education and the Civil Rights Act of 1964, to further eliminate discrimination and segregation. As for Mildred and Richard Loving, they returned to Central Point, Virginia, to raise their three children. Unfortunately, Richard passed away in 1975, being killed by a drunk driver. Mildred Loving died in 2008.

The holiday is not officially recognized by the United States government. However, the day has been recognized by the U.S. House of Representatives, and various states and cities. The commemoration and celebration of Loving v. Virginia is marked with events around the country each year. Small and large gatherings and parties take place. More formal celebrations began taking place when Ken Tanabe came up with the idea for Loving Day. He made the day the focus of his senior thesis project in 2004, while at Parsons the New School of Design. He launched the Loving Day website that June. Currently, volunteers in New York City and across the world run the website for the day, host a flagship Loving Day celebration in New York City, encourage celebrations around the world, and coordinate with community groups.

When it comes to when Red Rose day began, well, that information is a little skewed, and in truth, we don’t even know who started the whole thing off; the one thing we do know though, is why it began.

Believe it or not, Red Rose day used to be a part of the celebrations of Valentine’s week, but for some unknown reason became separated at some point over the last ten years. The history behind the red rose, and why we give it though, well, that is far more rich and full.

The earliest records we can see in regards to the cultivation of roses dates back almost 5000 years, and like most things, it starts in the far east. Rose cultivation started in China but soon found its way to Rome and Greece.

It is thought that roses were seen as a luxury muse and distributed among the rich who would then give them to artists to inspire them. It seems that, like most botanical pickings of this time, roses also found their way in the medicine of the time, and this was all before a single person had used one as an apology.

If we fast forward a little, we soon see that roses went from symbols of hope, peace, and love to become a symbol of war. In England, during the 15th century, there was a well-known war that saw two parties, both using the symbol of a rose to represent their army.

While now the rose is something that represents love, still to this day, we know this great 15th century battle as the war of the roses.

So, as you can see, even something as perfect as a rose can come with some bad blood in its history, the joy is that it’s most notable trait has carried through time, and it seems that it will continue to do so for many more years to come.

It seems that while the world is becoming infatuated with automation, technology, and doing everything online, days that celebrate romance will always hold a special place in the hearts of all.

Whether it’s Valentine’s Day or National Red Rose Day, you should try to make things as special and wonderful as you can for the person that you love. Nowadays, it can be hard to convey a message of love, especially with all the convenience of modern life that surrounds us.



Superman Day was started in 2013 by DC Entertainment, two days before the release of the Superman film, Man of Steel. At this time it was known as Man of Steel Day, and it was not until subsequent years that the day simply became known as Superman Day. Both the name change and the continuation of the day seem to have happened organically. On the inaugural day, DC Entertainment partnered with comic book retailers and bookstores across the United States to celebrate the day, and gave out free copies of All Star Superman #1 Special Edition. Superman was created in 1933 by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, but it wasn't until April 18, 1938 that the Superman we know of today appeared, and made his debut in Action Comics #1. It was so popular that Superman got his own comic book the following year.




Women Veterans Day is observed on June 12 in the United States, a date chosen to mark the anniversary of the Women's Armed Services Integration Act. The date is not recognized nationally, but is recognized by a number of states, either through legislation or proclamation, and organizations. The stated goal of Women Veterans Day varies somewhat by state, but can generally be acknowledged as an effort to honor the work of women in the United States Armed Forces and recognize the unique challenges that they have faced.[1] The date was first recognized when the New York State Assembly declared June 12, 2008, to be Women Veterans’ Recognition Day.[2]

We don’t know for sure when peanuts were first harvested, but evidence dating back 3,500 years ago indicates that ancient Incans of Peru used peanuts as sacrificial offerings. The peanut likely originated somewhere around modern-day Peru or Brazil, potentially growing as far north as Mexico, and was spread by European explorers. These Europeans likely brought peanuts to Africa and Asia, and it was eventually Africans who brought peanuts to North America in the 1700s.

In America, and particularly the South, peanut production took off. It was around the 1800s that peanuts became a commercial crop in the U.S., and demand for the product was high. Not only were they a great food, but they could also be used as oil or as a cocoa substitute. They were, however, challenging to raise and harvest, and mostly were only consumed by farm animals or those in poverty. That is until Union soldiers decided they liked them and found they were high in protein.

The early 1900s saw the destruction of cotton crops at the hands of the boll weevil, which threatened the livelihood of many farmers. Dr. George Washington Carver, a well-known scientist at the time, suggested many plantations switch to planting peanuts, which caused peanuts to be almost as popular of a crop as cotton in the South.

Determining who invented peanut butter, however, is a different beast. There’s evidence that the ancient Incas ground peanuts to make a primitive sort of peanut butter, though Dr. John Harvey Kellog is credited with creating the first peanut butter in the United States in 1895. There’s also some credit given for the invention of peanut butter to a physician from Saint Louis, who needed a way for his patients who were too old or sick to chew meat to get protein. After peanut butter’s introduction at the World’s Fair in 1904, however, it took off.

Dr. George Washington Carver included a recipe for peanut butter in his 1916 book on growing peanuts and preparing them to be eaten, and in 1922 Joseph Rosefield improved on the recipe by developing a way to prevent peanut oil from separating from the solids. Peanut butter had hit stores in 1920, and already peanut butter cookies were being homemade across America. In 1932, the first recipe for peanut butter cookies that featured the decoration with forks on top was printed in “The Schenectady Gazette,” and the peanut butter cookie had become the classic treat we know today.

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Old 06-12-2024, 12:35 PM
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Pretty roses!

Cute superman arts


Quote:
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Today marks the anniversary of the 1967 United States Supreme Court decision Loving v. Virginia, which invalidated anti-miscegenation laws, which are laws that ban interracial marriage. Sixteen states had such laws on the books at the time. These laws not only banned marriage between those who were black and white but sometimes banned marriage between other races as well. Loving Day commemorates and celebrates the Supreme Court decision, and highlights its importance to a generation of people who have grown up with interracial marriage being legal. The day also looks at issues that interracial couples still face today.
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Old 06-13-2024, 05:04 AM
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Today:
Sewing Machine Day
Weed Your Garden Day
Random Acts of Light Day (Cancer!)
National Cupcake Lover's Day
National Kitchen Klutzes of America Day
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Old 06-13-2024, 08:12 AM
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Do you have a Sewing Machine ?
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Old 06-13-2024, 09:19 AM
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Do you have a Sewing Machine ?
Mom has one. You?

Sewing machines, which are celebrated today, are used to stitch material like cloth or leather. They are usually powered by electricity, but many are still powered by a treadle, just as many early machines were. Their basic design has remained over the years, consisting of a needle, and a shuttle to carry thread. First being used in factories, they were a symbol of the industrial revolution, marking the shift from handmade to automated production. They also became important for home use. Women once spent much time sewing by hand, and the invention of the sewing machine helped free up a lot of this time.

Thomas Saint of England took out the first patent for a complete sewing machine. He was given patent #1764 in 1790. Some sources say that he received his patent on June 13, explaining why Sewing Machine Day takes when it does. The machine was to have an awl that punched a hole, and then a needle that would go through the hole. It is unknown if Saint created a prototype of his sewing machine, and only the drawings of it survive.

Over the next forty years, various sewing machines were created, all without much success. Then, in 1830, Barthelemy Thimonnier, a French tailor, created a functioning sewing machine. However, French tailors burnt down his garment factory because they thought his invention would drive them out of work. In 1834, Walter Hunt built the first somewhat functional sewing machine in America, although he did not get a patent.

Elias Howe adapted Hunt's style in 1846 and became the first to patent a sewing machine in America. His machine had a curved needle with an eye at the point. After going through the cloth, a loop was made with the thread, and a second thread went through the loop and interlocked with it. This created what became known as the lockstitch.

The first commercially successful sewing machine went into production in the 1850s. Built by Isaac Singer, it was the first to have an up-and-down motion mechanism and the first to be powered by a foot treadle instead of a hand crank. But, it did use the lockstitch that Elias Howe had patented. Although Howe had gotten the lockstitch idea from Walter Hunt, Howe sued Singer for copying his patent and won.

By 1860, there were more than 110,000 sewing machines being created per year in the United States. During the late nineteenth century, various other types of sewing machines were invented, such as the chain-stitch single-thread sewing machine, and the zig-zag stitch machine. Sewing machines were first used in garment factories, but in 1889, the first sewing machine for home use was made and marketed. By the early twentieth century, electric-powered sewing machines came into wide use.

Sewing machines were found in most homes for decades, where they were seen as necessities. They are not as integral to home life as they once were, but are still used to make clothes in factories. If it was not for the invention of the sewing machine, it would be much more difficult to make clothing, as it would still need to be made by hand. This seems to be a pretty good reason to celebrate the machines!


Weeds can inhibit garden plants from growing, as they compete with them for sunlight, nutrients, and water. A weed can be defined as anything that wasn't purposely planted but began growing anyway. A weed may be an edible or medicinal plant, and may even be a flower. Weeding should be done on a daily basis, but on Weed Your Garden Day, an extra five to ten minutes of weeding should be done. Not only will your plants be a little happier, but you will get some exercise as well.
Started by the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS), the world's largest voluntary health agency for blood cancer, Random Acts of Light Day exists to bring light to those suffering from the darkness of cancer. Celebrities often make surprise visits to patients and survivors of blood cancer, to lift them up and bring them a random act of light. Some participants have included baseball star Lance McCullers Jr., and Charles Esten of the television show Nashville. But there is no need for one to be famous in order to participate—anyone can do so!

The day creates awareness and educates the public about the need to fund research for blood cancer so that patients will have access to lifesaving treatments. It is an annual reminder to fight for a world without blood cancers. These cancers are the third most common deadly cancers in the United States, with someone dying in the country from them every nine minutes, or about 160 deaths a day. About 1.3 million people in the country suffer from blood cancer. The three main types are leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma. Leukemia is a cancer of the blood, as well as of marrow, the material inside of bones where blood cells form. There is both acute leukemia, which moves quickly and chronic leukemia, which progresses at a slower pace. Leukemia is the most common cancer of those under 20. However, the disease is most common with people over the age of 60.

Swirled with frosting, covered in sprinkles, dipped in ganache, or drizzled with chocolate, cupcakes are a one-of-a-kind dessert that are whimsically versatile for any occasion. They have evolved far and wide from just chocolate and vanilla to fulfill almost all of our dessert dreams and fantasies. Luckily, today is National Cupcake Day, recognized annually on December 15 to commemorate these compact yet delectable sweets. Indulge all you want in your favorite cupcake treats today—you’ll probably want seconds. Actually, make that thirds.




National Kitchen Klutzes of America Day is dedicated to everyone who has ever been a klutz in the kitchen. Some of you may have knocked a mixing bowl on the floor when you were stirring it. Some of you may have put the wrong ingredients in a recipe, burnt your creation to a crisp, or cut off your fingers. This day is for all of you. It is a day to remind you that it is okay to be a klutz in the kitchen, at least for a day.

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Old 06-13-2024, 01:51 PM
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A day for me


My mother has a sewing machine a bit like that
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Old 06-14-2024, 04:43 AM
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Today:
Flag Day
Army's Birthday
World Blood Donor Day
National Marriage Day
International Feta Day
National Cucumber Day
International Bath Day
Pop Goes The Weasel Day
National Strawberry Shortcake Day
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Old 06-14-2024, 08:19 AM
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I have a very very old one - that is used as a decoration







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Old 06-14-2024, 10:10 AM
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Flag Day commemorates the adoption of the flag of the United States, which took place on June 14, 1777. In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson made a proclamation establishing June 14th as Flag Day. In August 1949, National Flag Day was established by an act of Congress, which was signed by Harry Truman. However, Flag Day is not an official federal holiday. Before the government recognized Flag Day, citizens had been celebrating it and working to bring it to prominence for many years. Bernard J. Cigrand, a schoolteacher from Waubeka, Wisconsin, held the first formal observance of "Flag Day", or "Flag Birthday", at Stony Hill School in 1885. Cigrand continued to advocate for Flag Day and became the president of the American Flag Day Association and the National Flag Day Society. Cigrand is usually described as the "Father of Flag Day". On June 14, 1894, over 300,000 public school students celebrated Flag Day in parks across Chicago. In the 1890's, observances took place in other cities such as New York City and Philadelphia. Currently, the week of June 14th is known as "National Flag Week", and the president makes a proclamation urging people to fly flags for its duration. Flags are flown on government buildings as well.

At the start of the Revolutionary War, the colonial troops consisted of various New England militia companies that had banded together. They were without a unified chain of command and were paid and equipped by the colonies that they came from. In the spring of 1775, this ragtag group was set to take on the British in Boston. In order for them to stand a chance, reorganization was necessary. The Massachusetts Provincial Congress asked the Second Continental Congress, which was based in Philadelphia, to take the reins of the army. On June 14, 1775, the American Continental Army formed, in order to present a unified opposition against Britain.

Because of the need for secrecy at the time, there aren't many public accounts from the day of the formation of the Army. There is a record of Congress forming a committee "to bring in a draft of rules and regulations for the government of the Army" and appropriating $2 million to support the troops around Boston and New York City. Congress also authorized the formation of ten companies of "expert riflemen" in Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Maryland. These became the first soldiers raised directly for the Continental Army, and they were directed to Boston to support the soldiers that were already there.

On June 15, George Washington was unanimously chosen and appointed as "General and Commander in Chief" of the Continental Army. He took command in Boston on July 3. On June 16, other senior officers were authorized for the Army, with generals being appointed in the following days. By the third week in June, there were close to 15,000 Continental Army troops in Boston, and by the first week in July there were close to 20,000. By the third week in July, Boston had 22,000 troops and New York City had 5,000. Washington led the Continental Army to victory over the British; independence was solidified and the newly-formed country endured.

Following the Revolutionary War, the Continental Army was supplanted with the United States Army, which was created in June 1784. The Army is the land warfare branch of the Armed Forces. It is the oldest branch, and one of eight uniformed services. Along with the Navy and Air Force, it is part of the Department of Defense. It is the largest military branch: as of 2017 over one million members made up the combined forces of the Regular Army, Army National Guard, and Army Reserve.

The history of blood donation goes far back, with the first transfusions done using poorly understood science and very early research. But it wasn’t until Richard Lower was the first one to examine the science of blood donation with animals. He managed to successfully transfuse blood between two dogs with no appreciable ill effects.

And the science that surrounded the topic of blood slowly developed from that point, breaking taboos and moving from animal experimentation. From progress in transfusion technology to Karl Landsteiner discovering the ABO human blood type system to best determine donors, blood transfusions quickly became a staple in health topics and the medical field.

Following on from the success of World Health Day in the year 2000, which focussed on blood donation and the safety of transfusions, ministers of health from all across the world made a unanimous declaration in May 2005, during the 58th World Health Assembly, to designate World Blood Donor Day as an annual event held on every June 14, choosing Landsteiner’s birthday to commemorate it.

World Blood Donor Day aims to raise awareness regarding the need for regular blood donations, important to keep the health industry with a stable supply, and to celebrate the hard work of medical professionals that work in the research and development for new technology and uses for donated blood, as well as medical teams who use blood on a regular basis. This day is also used to thank donors for their service and determination to save lives and make the world a better place.

Elkton, a town located in Cecil County in the northeast corner of Maryland, was once known as the Wedding Capital of the East. In 1913, Delaware enacted a marriage waiting period law similar to laws in other states along the Atlantic seaboard. Many people began traveling to Maryland to get married, and especially to Elkton because it was the closest county seat to those traveling to the state from the north. Not only did Maryland not have a waiting period requirement, but they also did not require residency, blood tests, or witnesses.

Wedding chapels began popping up everywhere along Main Street, and at one point there were more than fifteen of them. During the town's wedding heyday, which lasted for a quarter century, about 12,000 people got married there each year. This was at a time when the town had a population of roughly 3,000. The train that brought people to town was known as the Honeymoon Express, and guests would take taxis from the train station to the courthouse or a chapel. Babe Ruth, Willie Mays, Billie Holiday, and Joan Fontaine all got married there. In more recent years, Charles Barkley tied the knot in Elkton.

But by the end of 1938, the glory years of Elkton's weddings had ended, after the state approved a 48-hour waiting period for getting married. Exacerbating the decline was the rise of Las Vegas as a wedding city, as well as a new traffic pattern that made people less likely to end up in Elkton. In October 1938, there were 2,344 wedding ceremonies in the town; in December, there were only 277.

Today, all the original chapels are gone. Closing in 2017, The Little Wedding Chapel was the last to go. A marker now stands beside it, designating the town as the Wedding Capital of the East. For decades, the Elkton Chamber of Commerce and Alliance held National Marriage Day on the second Friday in June. The day was dedicated to weddings and the renewing of vows. Usually between five and fifteen couples participated in the day. Sometimes spouses who had gotten married in Elkton years earlier would return to renew their vows. Wedding cake, champagne, and hors d'oeuvres were served, and a horse-drawn carriage was present for couples to ride around town in. In recent years, the day became of less importance, and in 2015, no couples came to get married. Still, National Marriage Day can be celebrated by anyone, whether they get married and renew their vows or not, or whether they travel to Elkton or stay in their own city.

Feta is a Greek brined white cheese made from sheep's milk or from a mixture of sheep and goat's milk. It is soft, with small or no holes, a compact touch, few cuts, and no skin. Crumbly with a slightly grainy texture, it is formed into large blocks and aged in brine

The cucumber is a widely-cultivated creeping vine plant in the family Cucurbitaceae that bears cylindrical to spherical fruits, which are used as culinary vegetables. Considered an annual plant, there are three main types of cucumber—slicing, pickling, and seedless—within which several cultivars have been created.

It was on June 14 that the Greek mathematician, scientist, and scholar Archimedes discovered that an object’s volume could be accurately measured by being submerged in water — while he was in a bath! Eager to share his excitement over this discovery, Archimedes jumped out of the bathtub and yelled “Eureka, eureka!” as he ran through the streets of Syracuse. While not all of us are geniuses, International Bath Day is also an ideal day for encouraging learning and discovery in children. Bath toys can be incorporated during bath time to teach children about the basic workings of the universe.

Today, we are used to comfortable bathrooms with showers, tubs, and pressure-controlled water flow. But, not very long ago, bathing used to be quite an uncomfortable experience. For example, in 19th century England, a bath was simply a large cold metal container placed in front of a fireplace — without any plumbing. And, in other parts of the world, people had to take a dip in a nearby pond or river when they wanted to clean themselves, braving cold weather conditions and other health hazards. Even as we enjoy comfortable baths in temperature-controlled water, it’s essential to remember that there are many people in the world without any access to clean and potable water. So even though it’s alright to enjoy a luxurious bath every once in a while, we must remember to never waste water.



Pop Goes the Weasel Day celebrates the popular nursery rhyme, "Pop Goes the Weasel." The rhyme's meaning and origin are debated, and there are various American and English versions of it. It was first published in 1850, in America, as a dance song titled "Pop goes the Weasel for Fun and Frolic." It was referred to as an English dance—meaning England is probably where it originated from. It is likely that an oral form of the nursery rhyme existed there long before 1850.

The dance "Pop goes the Weasel" was popular in England in the 1850s. Done on stage and in dance-halls, it didn't have lyrics beyond the shouting out of "Pop goes the weasel." More lyrics were soon added, but they weren't solidified in Britain and took on various forms in America as well.

The most basic and common lyrics in England were as follows:

Half a pound of tuppeny rice
Half a pound of treacle
That's the way the money goes
Pop! goes the weasel

Every night when I go out
The monkey's on the table
Take a stick and knock it off
Pop! goes the weasel

A common American verse, which was first printed in 1914, is as follows:

All around the mulberry bush
The monkey chased the weasel
The monkey stopped to pull up his sock, (or The monkey stopped to scratch his nose, or The monkey fell down and oh what a sound)
Pop! goes the weasel

One theory takes the lyrics literally, saying the song is about weasels popping their heads up—something they do naturally when they are disturbed. Weasel may also be a play on the word "whistle." Another theory says that the song is about pawning a suit, where "pop" is the word for pawn, and "weasel" for suit. There are many other theories, and it is even possible that at the height of the dance craze in the 1850s, people didn't know what it meant.

Shortly after the dance gained popularity, by at least 1856, the phrase "Pop goes the weasel" began taking on its own meaning apart from the song. It came to indicate that something had happened "just like that." By the late nineteenth century, in Britain, the rhyme started being used to play a game that was similar to musical chairs.


Strawberry shortcake is enjoyed today on National Strawberry Shortcake Day! The dessert is prepared with fresh strawberries, whipped cream, and shortcake—a soft, sweet biscuit. Sliced strawberries are mixed with sugar and set over the bottom half of a split shortcake. Whipped cream is added and the top of the shortcake is replaced, then more strawberries and whipped cream are added.

Strawberry shortcake is popular during the summer, a time when much fruit is harvested. It is particularly popular on the Fourth of July, when blueberries are sometimes added to the dish to make it red, white, and blue. Shortcake was first referenced in a British cookbook in 1588. Strawberry shortcake began appearing and became popular in the mid-nineteenth century. At the time it was made with butter and sweetened cream. French pastry chefs introduced heavy whipped cream in the early twentieth century, creating the strawberry shortcake that is loved today.

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