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Old 06-11-2016, 12:38 PM
  #46
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Thanks for the video interview!
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Old 06-11-2016, 11:15 PM
  #47
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J.K. Rowling: "I don't think I realised how anxious I was, to tell you the absolute truth, until Wednesday morning," she told the BBC.

"I'd seen the whole play performed in the theatre, I'd seen the whole dress rehearsal, and I was blown away by it.

"I've been working on it for two years along with these guys, I knew exactly what was coming, I'd seen all of it rehearsed at some point, and yet I was still completely blown away by it. Incredibly moved.

"But even so, this is putting me back ten years. Potter attracted a lot of madness and a lot of hype.

"Going back into that place, I realised on Wednesday morning how anxious that had made me.

"Because I knew how much expectation there would be, and I didn't want to let fans down."
Quote:
J.K. Rowling: When asked whether she felt the Harry Potter story was now owned by its fanbase, she told BBC arts editor Will Gompertz: "I wouldn't go that far, Will. Because that would be - and I'm deadly serious - that would be to disavow what that world was to me.

"For 17 years that world was mine, and for seven years it was entirely mine - not a living soul knew anything about it.

"And I can't just uproot that from all the personal experiences that inform those stories and say I'm throwing that away now.

"Til my dying breath I will care deeply about those stories."
J.K. Rowling comments on her nerves, excitement over 'Cursed Child' plays opening - SnitchSeeker.com



Quote:
Can you imagine, ever, creating a world which has had a profound impact as the Potter world?
J.K. Rowling:
No, and nor would I want to. I feel as though I did that, and I love it; it takes up so much mental space. It takes a lot of space in the actual world now. I think I would be on a fool's errand to try to that again.
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Old 06-12-2016, 10:07 AM
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Great interview!
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Old 06-12-2016, 10:53 PM
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Old 06-18-2016, 03:46 PM
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The Cormoran Strike Series to start shooting soon!
Filming on “The Cormoran Strike Mysteries” Will Soon Be Underway | MuggleNet

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It’s been a while since we’ve had any news about the BBC adaptation of Robert Galbraith’s Cormoran Strike series (to be fair, we’ve been distracted by a deluge of other Rowling-related happenings!), but it seems that production on the series will soon be underway!
The show, which is going by the title of The Cormoran Strike Mysteries, will have seven 60-minute episodes. Sources suggest that these seven episodes may cover all three of the books released so far:
The lengthy shoot will be delivered as 7 x 60 episodes, incorporating three of the books in the series of novels about the eponymous injured war veteran turned private investigator Strike and his assistant Robin as they investigate crimes in the capital’s murky underbelly.
Although no information about casting is available yet, we do know that the show is due to begin filming in London in the fall – so we should know before too long who will be portraying Strike and Robin!
Sarah Phelps, who also worked on the television adaptation of J.K. Rowling’s The Casual Vacancy, will co-write the show with Ben Richards. Rowling herself will serve as one of the executive producers, along with Neil Blair (of the Blair Partnership) and Ruth Kenley-Letts. The production company for the series will be Bronte Film and TV, founded by Rowling and Blair.
Can't wait to see who they've cast as Cormoran and Robin!
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Old 06-18-2016, 11:53 PM
  #51
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Jo!


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Old 06-20-2016, 05:31 AM
  #52
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J.K. Rowling

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On Monsters, Villains and the EU Referendum
I'm not an expert on much, but I do know how to create a monster.

All enduring fictional bad guys encapsulate primal terrors and share certain traits. Invincible to the point of immortality, they commit atrocities without conscience and cannot be defeated by the ordinary man or by conventional means. Hannibal Lecter, Big Brother, and Lord Voldemort: all are simultaneously inhuman and superhuman and that is what frightens us most.

As this country has entered what will come to be seen as one of the most divisive and bitter political campaigns ever waged within its borders, I've thought a lot about the rules for creating villains. We are being asked whether we wish to remain part of the European Union and both sides of this campaign have been telling us stories. I don't mean that in the sense of lying (although lies have certainly been told). I mean that they are appealing to us through our universal need to make sense of the world by storytelling and that they have not been afraid to conjure monsters calculated to stir up our deepest fears.

This is nothing new, of course. All political campaigns tell stories. They cast themselves as our champions, flatter us with tales of who we are or could be, sell us rose-tinted memories of the past and draw frightening pictures of the perils that lie ahead if we pick the wrong heroes. Nevertheless, the tales we have been told during this referendum have been uglier than any I can remember in my lifetime. If anyone has enjoyed this referendum, it can only be those hoping for greater personal power at the end of it.

The Leave campaign's narrative has descended to this: we are being exploited or cheated by the EU. If we can't see that Britain will only regain superpower status if we leave the union, we must be unpatriotic, cowardly or part of a corrupt elite.

Remainers have mostly countered, not with an optimistic vision of the union, but with bleak facts: money is pouring out of the country at the prospect of the Brexit and experts in every field think that leaving the EU will be a catastrophic mistake. Be afraid, says Remain, turn back while there's still time: you are hurtling towards a precipice.

However, Remain are finding many ears closed to their grim prognostications. The economic crash of 2008 left a pervasive feeling in its wake that financial institutions are not to be trusted. 'The establishment' has become a term of blanket abuse. We live in a cynical and insecure age. Trust in disinterested sources has been shaken, while popular culture glorifies the hunch and the gut feeling. In America, they call this 'post-truth politics'. Forget the facts, feel the fury.

The 'Leave' campaign is benefiting from our widespread cynicism and, unsurprisingly, fanning it. 'People in this country have had enough of experts,' Michael Gove declared recently on television. So what if the Financial Times, the markets and the heads of the Bank of England and the International Monetary Fund agree that Brexit will do severe damage to the economy? They're just scaremongering, says Gove. Leaders of both campaigns want us frightened only by monsters of their choosing.

For some on the Leave side, the EU is not merely imperfect, or in need of improvement: it is villainous. The union that was born out of a collective desire never to see another war in Europe is depicted as an Orwellian monolith, Big Brotheresque in its desire for control. Widespread confusion about what the EU does and does not do has been helpful to Leave. The results of a recent IPSOS/Mori poll reveal the depth of our ignorance. We dramatically underestimate the amount of international investment we receive from the EU, while grossly overestimating how many laws it makes, how much it spends on administration and the number of EU immigrants in this country. In some cases our guesses were out by factors of ten.

Immigrants, of course, have been at the centre of some of the nastiest arguments of this campaign. Reasoned discussion has proven nigh on impossible. Remainers insist that we retain border control and that we need immigration, not least because so many of our medical staff running the NHS come from abroad. They insist that our defensive capability and our anti-terrorist strategies are enhanced by membership of the EU. Their arguments have proven only partially successful, because Leave has been busy threatening us with another montster: a tsunami of faceless foreigners heading for our shores, among them rapists and terrorists.

It is dishonourable to suggest, as many have, that Leavers are all racists and bigots: they aren't and it is shameful to suggest that they are. Nevertheless, it is equally nonsensical to pretend that racists and bigots aren't flocking to the 'Leave' cause, or that they aren't, in some instances, directing it. For some of us, that fact alone is enough to give us pause. The picture of Nigel Farage standing in front of a poster showing a winding line of Syrian refugees captioned 'Breaking Point' is, as countless people have already pointed out, an almost exact duplicate of propaganda used by the Nazis.

Nationalism is on the march across the Western world, feeding upon the terrors it seeks to inflame. Every nationalist will tell you that their nationalism is different, a natural, benign response to their country's own particular needs and challenges, nothing to do with that nationalism of yore that ended up killing people, yet every academic study of nationalism has revealed the same key features. Your country is the greatest in the world, the nationalist cries, and anyone who isn't chanting that is a traitor! Drape yourself in the flag: doesn't that make you feel bigger and more powerful? Finding the present scary? We've got a golden past to sell you, a mythical age that will dawn again once we've got rid of the Mexicans/left the EU/annexed Ukraine! Now place your trust in our simplistic slogans and enjoy your rage aginst the Other!

Look towards the Republican Party in America and shudder. 'Make America Great Again!' cries a man who is fascist in all but name. His stubby fingers are currently within horrifyingly close reach of America's nuclear codes. He achieved this pre-eminence by proposing crude, unworkable solutions to complex threats. Terrorism? 'Ban all Muslims!' Immigration? 'Build a wall!' He has the temperament of an unstable nightclub bouncer, jeers at violence when it breaks out at his rallies and wears his disdain for women and minorities with pride. God help America. God help us all.

Donald Trump supports the break up of the EU. The inheritor of a family fortune, he has never needed to cooperate or collaborate and he appears incapable of understanding complexity or nuance. Of foreign leaders or would-be leaders, Trump is joined only by Vladimir Putin and Marine le Pen in urging Brexit upon the UK. Other than those three, there is no major political leader who isn't begging Britain to stay put, for the political and economic stability of Europe and the wider world.

I'm the mongrel product of this European continent and I'm an internationalist. I was raised by a Francophile mother whose family was proud of their part-French heritage. My French ancestors lived in the troubled province of Alsace, which spent hundreds of years being alternately annexed by Germany and France. I've lived in France and Portugal and I've studied French and German. I love having these mulitple allegiances and cultural associations. They make me stronger, not weaker. I glory in association with the cultures of my fellow Europeans. My values are not contained or proscribed by borders. The absence of a visa when I cross the channel has symbolic value to me. I might not be in my house, but I'm still in my hometown.

The 'Leave' campaign is selling itself as the courageous option. Take a leap of faith, they say. Step off the cliff and let the flag catch you! With the arrogance of a bunch of mini-Trumps they swear that everything will be glorious as long as we disregard the experts and listen to them. Embrace the rage and trust your guts, which Nigel Farage undoubtedly hopes contain a suspicion of brown people, an unthinking jingoism and an indifference to the warnings of history.

For many of our countrymen, I suspect a 'Leave' vote will be a simple howl of frustration, a giant two fingers to the spectres that haunt our imaginations, against terrorism that seems almost supernatural in its ability to hit us in our most vulnerable places, against huge corporations who refuse to meet their basic moral obligations, against bureaucracy we are afraid will strangle us, against shadowy elites we are told are working to do us down. How easy to project all of this onto the EU, how satisfying to turn this referendum into a protest against everything about modern life that scares us, whether rationally or not.

Yet how can a retreat into selfish and insecure individualism be the right response when Europe faces genuine threats, when the bonds that tie us are so powerful, when we have come so far together? How can we hope to conquer the enormous challenges of terrorism and climate change without cooperation and collaboration?

No, I don't think the EU's perfect. Which human union couldn't use improvement? From friendships, marriages, families and workplaces, all the way up to political parties, governments and cultural economic unions, there will be flaws and disagreements. Because we're human. Because we're imperfect. So why bother building these ambitious alliances and communities? Because they protect and empower us, because they enable bigger and better achievements than we can manage alone. We should be proud of our enduring desire to join together, seeking better, safer, fairer lives, for ourselves and for millions of others.

The research demonstrates that we don't know what we've got. Ignorant of what it gives us, we take the benefits of EU membership for granted. In a few days' time, we'll have to decide which monsters we believe are real and which illusory. Everything is going to come down to whose story we like best, but at the moment we vote, we stop being readers and become authors. The ending of this story, whether happy or not, will be written by us.

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Old 06-20-2016, 06:27 AM
  #53
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Not in tune with anything that has to do with the EU referendum but kudos to Jo for speaking out.




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Old 06-23-2016, 08:13 PM
  #54
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Quote:
J.K. Rowling: ‘My heroes are always people who feel themselves to be set apart, stigmatised or othered. That’s at the heart of most of what I write, and it’s certainly at the heart of this movie.’
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Old 06-24-2016, 10:07 AM
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So sad to hear this actually happened.





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Old 06-24-2016, 11:15 PM
  #56
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The 2nd tweet is hilarious.


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Old 06-27-2016, 01:41 PM
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Old 06-27-2016, 11:26 PM
  #58
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Quote:
J.K. Rowling and actor Eddie Redmayne will take part in a special screening of Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them at New York City's Carnegie Hall six days before the film's release, Saturday, November 12, 2016, and all ticket proceeds will go to benefit Lumos.

More information on how to purchase tickets, beginning this Monday at 11am EST, can be found here.

Director David Yates will introduce the film live, and other cast members (tentative list to be released) will also be in attendance

Fantastic Beasts' has two confirmed red carpet premieres prior to the film's Lumos gala screening - a world premiere in New York City; and a U.K. premiere in London early November.
J.K. Rowling, Eddie Redmayne to attend 'Fantastic Beasts' Lumos screening in NYC - SnitchSeeker.com
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Old 06-28-2016, 06:07 PM
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ME TOO! I'm in the same house as JO!
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Old 06-28-2016, 11:24 PM
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Quote:
The idea of naming the houses after themselves, as the founders, was swiftly abandoned, because Webster felt a house called ‘Webster Boot’ had no chance of ever winning anything, and instead, each chose their favourite magical beast.

For Chadwick, an intelligent but often temperamental boy, it was the Thunderbird that can create storms as it flies. For argumentative but fiercely loyal Webster, it was the Wampus, a magical panther-like creature that was fast, strong and almost impossible to kill. For Isolt, it was, of course, the Horned Serpent that she still visited and with which she felt a strange sense of kinship.

• Horned Serpent – a ‘great horned river serpent with a jewel set into its forehead’
• Pukwudgie – ‘a short, grey-faced, large-eared creature’
• Thunderbird – a creature that ‘can create storms as it flies’
• Wampus – ‘a magical, panther-like creature that is fast, strong and almost impossible to kill’
J.K. Rowling reveals her North America's Ilvermorny school House after sorting - SnitchSeeker.com
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