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Old 03-09-2005, 08:54 PM
  #31
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Hm..maybe I will have to rent one and see if I like it.
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Old 03-10-2005, 03:26 AM
  #32
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yup they are quite good, but only do it if you have enough time and just start with the first one cause you need a bit of break between them
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Old 03-11-2005, 11:32 AM
  #33
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Sin City
EW talks with the stars of Robert Rodriguez's newest film
by Jeff Jensen


Clive Owen is trying to explain everything that is cool about Sin City, a $40 million marriage of crime saga and special effects starring Bruce Willis, Mickey Rourke, and the man who would be King Arthur. But when a woman tarted up in black leather is spitting bloody chunks of flesh on the floor, this can be difficult.

We are inside the Texas filmmaking HQ of movie maverick Robert Rodriguez (Once Upon a Time in Mexico), where on a soundstage that's wall-to-wall greenscreen, Alexander's Rosario Dawson is ravaging the neck of Gilmore Girls' Alexis Bledel. Both play hookers in Sin City, a movie teeming with shady characters. Mobsters, mercenaries, cannibals — you know, the usual underbelly scum. In this scene, Bledel is explaining why she has betrayed their sisterhood of pistol-packing prostitutes, when suddenly Dawson lunges and chomps. . .on a strip of latex slathered in red corn syrup tucked behind Bledel's ear. She rips it away and spits. Lips dripping with cherry goo, Dawson smiles like she just won a pie-eating contest.

Through all of this, Owen, clad in a trench coat and red Converse, has been trying to make several important points in a low whisper.

''Robert is totally outside the Hollywood loop. Does everything his own way. I can't see any other way to do this movie — ''

''You bit me!'' Bledel shrieks.

''Sin City is violent,'' Owen continues, ''but with tremendous wit. It's film noir, bent out of shape — ''

''Arrrrggghh!'' Bledel wobbles and falls.

''Everyone has the same objective,'' Owen goes on, ''to bring Frank Miller's comics to life. Literally.''

Fake flesh splats on the floor.

Owen shakes his head. ''That's wrong. Just wrong.''

Behind a wall of monitors that resembles a workstation at NASA mission control, Rodriguez, wearing his trademark cowboy hat and strumming a guitar, reviews Dawson's chomp. One screen shows the shot in color; another shows the shot converted into stark black and white; yet another shows the shot as drawn in The Big Fat Kill, one of three graphic novels that make up theinterconnected, Pulp Fictionesque triptych of Sin City. Rodriguez's intention is to replicate the comics nearly panel for panel — a gambit as bold as it is commercially risky. But in Sin City, people are always doing crazy things for love. For all its splatter, the film is really mushy — a big, bloody valentine, from one fiercely independent artist to another. So determined is Rodriguez to get this right, he made the comic-book auteur his codirector. ''Looks good,'' says Miller with a nod.

''Good,'' says Dawson. ''Don't want to wimp out on Frank.''

''Sin City is a pretty f---ed-up place,'' Owen concludes, as he wades into the green for the next scene, picking up a prop as he goes. It's a decapitated head.

Bits of flesh and severed noggins, sadistic brutes and femmes fatales — and we haven't even mentioned the Yellow Bastard, who is literally yellow and actually a rapist. Sin City might be a comic-book movie, but you won't find masked marvels patrolling these scuzzy streets. ''I told my mom I was dressed like an S&M superhero,'' says Dawson. ''She was like, 'What's your name?' I said 'Gail.' She said, 'No, your superhero name?' I said, 'No, Mom, I'm not actually a superhero. . .'''

But there is a creative Superman behind Sin City: Frank Miller, who made a pop splash in 1986 with The Dark Knight Returns, a radical reinvention of Batman that certified his genius and proved funnybooks could be seriously good. The karma gods rewarded him with a shot at writing movies, beginning with. . .Robocop 2. His script was wild with ideas — in short, too long — and was severely revamped. He's sanguine now. But at the time, he was bruised. ''When I went back to comics,'' says Miller, ''I threw caution to the wind and did my dream project.''

Out fumed Sin City. Nothing else had ever looked like it: spartan storytelling and smashmouth violence, rendered in jet black and angel white and a periodic gush of color. Since 1991, Miller has produced seven volumes' worth of Sin ''yarns,'' none better than his shock-of-the-new first. Its hero was a hulking killer with a billowing trench coat named Marv, out to avenge the murder of the only woman who dared love his ugly mug. His growling thoughts were pure pulp poetry: . . .and when his eyes go dead the hell I send him to will seem like heaven after what I've done to him. I love you, Goldie. ''The main parameter I had was it had to be fun to draw, because what's fun to draw is fun to look at,'' says Miller, 48, whose sharp-edged avian profile and hard-boiled imagination belie his shy, kinda shlubby demeanor. He likens himself to Dwight, the romantic Everyman of Big Fat Kill.

Yes, Hollywood was interested. Miller resisted, because no one could guarantee utter faithfulness. It had to be his way, or no way. ''I decided Sin City was going to be this rack of books that people enjoyed for what they were, not homogenized, sterilized, given happy endings,'' says Miller. ''I didn't know there was a third way.''

The third way presented itself in 2003 in the form of Robert Rodriguez. The El Mariachi wunderkind was coming off Spy Kids 3-D, which he'd shot digitally on the new green stage at his Austin studios, a private playground financed from the shrewd maximization of his Hollywood opportunities. Rodriguez worked on special effects for Spy Kids 3-D, in addition to his usual workload of directing, producing, photographing, editing, sound mixing, and scoring. He was writing a thriller to follow up his kid flick, but it wasn't moving him. ''Having learned all this s---, I realized I wanted to apply it to something more challenging,'' says Rodriguez, 36, who is also an accomplished chef, has his own rock band, and in his spare time writes and draws bedtime stories for his four boys.

Rodriguez had been a Sin City fan since the beginning. Looking at the books again in 2003, he saw the potential for another Matrix, perhaps, ''one of those visual turning points, where people would see movies in a different way.'' He also recognized a kindred soul in Miller. ''I loved that he did Sin City all himself, just for himself. . . . I was willing to take his baby in my hands, because I wasn't going to drop it. I wanted to make his version. Not mine.''

Things happened quickly, as they often do with Rodriguez. In September 2003, he met Miller in New York and made his pitch. ''I don't want to adapt Sin City,'' said Rodriguez. ''I want to translate it.'' Miller replied, ''Nice choice of words, mister.'' In January 2004, Rodriguez invited Miller to Austin to demonstrate how computer animation could replicate Miller's shadow world. The ''test'' material was Miller's two-character short story ''The Customer Is Always Right,'' with Josh Hartnett and Marley Shelton playing the roles. '''Test,''' says Miller. ''That was the stealth name for 'first day of photography.''' (In fact, ''Customer'' serves as Sin City's opening sequence.) ''Coming to Austin finished the deal. Robert knew it would.''

Soon after completing ''Customer,'' Rodriguez and Miller got a $40 million green light from Miramax/Dimension. The plan was to make Marv's tale, plus The Big Fat Kill, in which Owen's Dwight and Dawson's hookers find themselves up crap creek after a fateful encounter with a very bad Benicio Del Toro, and That Yellow Bastard, about a good cop (Willis) with a bad heart who tangles with the titular monster (Nick Stahl) over a lasso-twirling exotic dancer (Jessica Alba). Sold by the ''Customer'' test, Willis was among the first to sign on. ''About a minute into it,'' the actor recalls, ''I said, 'No matter what else I see, I want you to know I'm in.'''

For the seriously screwed-up Marv, Rodriguez wanted Mickey Rourke, who knows his way around screwed-up. ''I've spent most of my life feeling like Marv,'' says the 9 1/2 Weeks star. During his first meeting with Rourke, Miller recalls writing in his notebook: ''Mickey is Marv.'' Such sentiment has its sting. After all, the notorious Rourke is trying to put his past behind him. ''I remember going to my shrink with the graphic novels and saying, 'See how they see me, doc? They still see me that way.'''

On the eve of shooting last March, turbulence: The Directors Guild of America objected to crediting Miller as codirector, a title that the organization grants sparingly. The DGA suggested making Miller a producer. Instead, Rodriguez quit the DGA — a ballsy bit of rebellion that cost him the chance to direct Paramount's big-budget fantasy A Princess of Mars and stalled plans to expand his Austin operation; Rodriguez wanted to use Paramount's largesse to build another soundstage. ''I never liked clubs, anyway,'' he quips. Seriously: ''It was important to me for Frank to be in a recognized position of authority so people respected him,'' says Rodriguez.

''What a mensch, huh?'' says Miller.

''Having the man who created this world on set was invaluable — especially since we couldn't technically see it,'' says Elijah Wood, who plays (brace yourself) a mute cannibal serial killer. Everyone had his greenscreen-is-a-bitch story: Stahl had to wear stinky blue body paint so the animators could later paint him yellow. Some sets were built, like the skanky bar where Alba dances. Otherwise it was greenscreen�canvas for the F/X firms charged with realizing the blighted cityscape, snowy forests, pounding rain, and ravenous killer dog.

One Sin City player did attempt to revolt against the tech tyranny: Quentin Tarantino, whom Rodriguez asked to helm a truly Tarantinoesque passage — a long drive-and-talk between Owen and Del Toro. It was a challenge to the Kill Bill director, designed to settle a debate between them. Digital filmmaking: bliss or blasphemy? At first, Tarantino insisted on a real car. But after one take, the director became bothered by the limited range of camera angles, ditched the wheels, and put the actors on crates. (Not surprisingly, Rodriguez takes great pleasure in telling this story.)

Sin City may be the most faithful comic-book adaptation ever, but there have been some changes. Like the nudity. ''Frank never intended his comics to be a movie,'' says Rodriguez. ''I'd say, 'Do we really want this guy's dork hanging out here?' And Frank would say, 'Oh, yeah. That would be distracting.''' And while the plan always called for selective uses of color, Rodriguez is currently adding more as he wraps the film from home, in his teched-out garage. (He often works in his jammies.) Commercial considerations aren't a factor, insists the director (who has final cut), and it's hard to believe the studio is sweating a lack of color — not with a scene where Del Toro gets dunked in an unflushed toilet, then spits up yellow water. Asked if he's tossing and turning over Sin City's violence, Dimension boss Bob Weinstein points to saving graces like Dawson's outfit: ''I know what I think about when I go to sleep at night.''

Miller himself is dreaming of sequels. ''I want the job,'' says the artist, whose next comics project — a new Batman series, which he's writing — has fanboys foaming. (Miller tells EW he's also working on a timely-as-it-sounds graphic novel tentatively called Holy Terror Batman!)Rodriguez is game for more Sin; he likes the thought of having all of Miller's yarns together on DVD.

Until then, Rodriguez is keeping it clean — and close to home. He just wrapped another 3-D family movie, The Adventures of Shark Boy and Lava Girl, based on an idea of his 7-year-old son, Racer. It will mark a turning point for Rodriguez: His longtime patrons, the Weinstein brothers, are expected to soon leave Disney, and the filmmaker is likely to follow. ''[Working together after Disney] is 100 percent in the cards,'' says Bob Weinstein. ''We're lifers.'' In fact, Rodriguez says Sin City was a clarifying experience. ''I couldn't have done Sin City with anyone else. What we have is really hard to build anywhere else.'' The Weinsteins certainly want to keep him happy. After nearly losing him to Princess of Mars, they promised he could make a big-budget opus with them, whenever he's ready. It might be a while. Rodriguez wants to follow Shark Boy with yet another family film made with his wife and sons. ''Like a giant home movie. That's where I started with El Mariachi,'' he says. ''Sometimes I think I'll grow up and do a really serious movie. But I'm already 36. I don't think there's much hope!''

2/14/2005
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Old 03-11-2005, 10:05 PM
  #34
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An avatar:
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Old 03-12-2005, 08:38 AM
  #35
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oh my thats brilliant, you should post it also in the avatar thread
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Old 03-13-2005, 02:57 PM
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Beautiful avatar. I said this on the icon thread, but I snagged it.

I got some friends to agree to see the movie with me -- hopefully they will stick to it.
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Old 03-14-2005, 01:58 AM
  #37
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yes a promise is a promise
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Old 03-15-2005, 09:24 PM
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Very true. But if they don't see it..I might consider seeing it by myself.
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Old 03-16-2005, 01:13 AM
  #39
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yup i mean after all your an independent woman there´s nothing gonna stop you
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Old 03-16-2005, 03:47 AM
  #40
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Take A Trip To 'Sin City'

March 16, 2005
Crawling with hardened criminals, crooked cops and sexy dames, 'Frank Miller's Sin City,' in theaters April 1, is chock full of dark characters looking for revenge or redemption. All this week, ET has the exclusives, including never-before-seen clips!

Based on the cult series of graphic novels created, written and illustrated by FRANK MILLER, the film contains three stories that take place in the titular, fictional city, translated from Miller's Sin City, The Big Fat Kill and That Yellow Bastard.

"I started looking at it as instead of trying to turn it into a movie, which would be terrible, let's take cinema and try to make it into this book," says director ROBERT RODRIGUEZ (the 'El Mariachi' and 'Spy Kids' trilogies), who co-directs with Miller to bring the graphic novel to life. "The mediums really are very similar; they're just snapshots of movement."

Hollywood's hottest stars clamored to be part of 'Sin City,' including BRUCE WILLIS, JESSICA ALBA, CLIVE OWEN, ROSARIO DAWSON, BRITTANY MURPHY, MICHAEL CLARK DUNCAN and ELIJAH WOOD, and the result is this year's most enviable cast.

"When we started casting all these parts, strange things started happening; people showed up who looked like my drawings," adds Miller. "In a lot of ways this movie's quite literally like having a dream come true."

But some who made the cut found themselves looking a lot more like their comic-book counterparts than they expected, some with the help of extensive make-up and prosthetics. Like MICKEY ROURKE, who plays Marv, an outcast on a mission to save the life of his one, true love (played by JAIME KING).

"When I was looking through the comic book, I didn't know which character [Rodriguez] wanted me to do," says Rourke. "Then I saw it was the character of Marvin, I got really excited cause it was this far-out lookin' cat that had some interesting things to say and do, and I thought, 'Wow, this is gonna be interesting and fun,' and its been a real hoot."

Anti-hero Rourke is somewhat recognizable despite his sloping forehead. So is bad guy BENICIO DEL TORO. NICK STAHL, on the other hand, is completely unrecognizable under tons of make-up as Yellow Bastard -- and the only character rendered in color (yellow, naturally) in the black-and-white movie palette (save for some surprising splashes of red).

JOSH HARTNETT, who gets to keep his good-looking mug intact, says he was hand-picked by Rodriguez before the project was even a go. "Robert just basically came to me and said, "I'm doing this graphic novel, makin' it into a movie, I don't have the rights to it, and I need somebody to come down and convince [Miller] to let us go ahead with it."

With the help of willing stars and some preliminary shots to show Miller what the final product would look like, Rodriguez clinched the deal and the rest, as they say, is history!

Watch ET all this week for 'Sin City' exclusives!


http://et.tv.yahoo.com/movies/2005/03/16/sincitybts/
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Old 03-16-2005, 10:30 AM
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Like I said on the news thread, that is very cool that Josh was hand-picked for the part. It shows that people are interested in him and how he acts.
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Old 03-17-2005, 01:15 AM
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Yes indeed it is, it shows he´s respected by people in hollywood which not many are

Now apparently losts of reviews are coming in these days and i´ll keep yall updated from aintitcool.com

L.D.K.A. takes in SIN CITY and is reduced to a sticky geeky amorphous throbbing mass of well pleasured flesh!
Hey folks, Harry here... I'm dying to see this film. Dying. All my doubts are officially gone. First off - I got a review - the type of reviews I despise that are literal step by step, shot for shot - that just spoils everything. I've chosen not to post it after talking with Moriarty & Quint - as there are going to be tons of reviews coming in on this movie - and they'll be all over the net. It sounds like Rodriguez and Miller nailed this one with railroad spikes. Beyond this - I've heard from a couple of folks that have seen it, as has Moriarty and the people we know... say it kicks unholy ass. Rodriguez? He's so happy with it that he's compulsively watching it over and over and over, unlike any film he's ever made, cuz he's so happy with it. Before I get to the main review - here's the opening of that spoiler review I was talking about - just so you can see how excited this comics professional (aka Killgore) got about the film:

Quote:
I’m going to try to get through this without resorting to hyperbole or exaggeration and without resorting to comparing it to its source material. That said, Sin City is a remarkable film, burning high contrast images on the backs of your retinas (if I stare at a blank white surface, Marv jumps out at me, though I’d rather it be Alba), and the hard boiled Chandleresque characters are permanently burnt into the back of my skull. This is not an adaptation. Rodriguez has translated verbatim Frank Miller’s graphic novel into a bombastic, hyper-stylized, modern art movie. Miller’s comic has not only served as a basis for the film, but the panels themselves have transcended the page and are emblazed on the silver screen. And is it ever silver.

The titular city is a corrupt, hedonistic city that exists somewhere between the Chicago of Scarface and the sensational (first person that uses the adjective sin-sational to describe it gets his nuts ripped off) universe of Kill Bill. The Bride could easily hack her way through these tittie bars and brothels. The seedy characters here drive 1930’s era Studebakers and speak in film noir lingo.
Ok - and now for the star attraction... A warning though... this review may in fact create such a fanatical lusting for this film that you will be rendered utterly useless till April 1st - and for the subsequent weeks after you too have been made drooly by this flick. Here ya go...
harry, you haven't used any of my previous early reviews, but maybe now you might, if only because now the early review in question is for SIN CITY.


Quote:
a little background--i'm a college student in boston, and my girlfriend got us tickets to a 2:30 PM sneak preview screening of SIN CITY at the Loews down the street; what's even cooler is the theater brought in a digital projector to show it. i don't know how she got 'em, i don't wanna know, but after seeing this film, i'm cool with whatever method of persuasion my little vixen of a gal used to score two tickets.

because this movie rocks.

hard.

you really have no idea. the previews rock, but the movie is so much more than any of them, with or without the music by the servants (the music in the movie is fine, but john debney, rodriguez, and graeme revell did it, not the servants). and best of all, i got to see it early. you all now have to sweat it out until April 1. well, maybe not you, harry, if only because you and rodriguez are tight. but hey, it sucks for me too, because the only thing i wanna do now is see SIN CITY again.

for those of you who don't know the plot, here's a brief summary:

story 1: the hard goodbye. initally called just sin city, the hard goodbye follows marv on his quest for vengeance after goldie, the one good thing in his life, is murdered next to him.

story 2: the big fat kill. this story follows dwight, a murderer with a new face, as he teams up with the prostitutes of Old Town to deal with the potentially fatal repercussions of killing dirty cop Jack Rafferty.

story 3: that yellow bastard. hardigan, the only decent cop in Sin City, squares off against Senator Roark as well as Roark's vicious, child molesting son Junior in an attempt to protect young Nancy Callahan.

additionally, these three stories are bookended with some short scenes dealing with Josh Hartnett's hitman character. the first one a lot of you have seen, i'm sure, when the comicon footage premiered online months ago, but the last one is new and a great way to end the movie.

this movie is almost a ****in' masterpiece. even though i'm still jazzed by the whole experience, i can safely say it's the most visceral movie experience i've had in a long while, as well as maybe my new favorite comic book movie of all time (beating out superman 1 and 2, X2, and spiderman 2). i've only a few minor qualms, which i'll get to in a second, but they keep the movie at a 9, maybe only 9 and a half, than the perfect 10 it could be.

as much as i love what michael mann did with his high-def camera on collateral, rodriguez tops him on SIN CITY. harry, remember when you worried that the HD wouldn't look as good as film stock shot bu guillermo navarro? well, don't panic. the HD is positively lush, with great, rich blacks, greys, and whites. this looks like the bastard son of all the great '40s noir films ever made. and i mean that in the best way possible, i mean it as a compliment.

not only does rodriguez top mann, he also tops kerry conran and his digital work on sky captain. all the sets in this movie are CGI'ed in as well, but they feel real. the characters interact with them, rather than around them (my biggest sky captain qualm). best yet, this movie just feels like rodriguez simply filmed miller's comics. in a way, that's the best thing i could say about this movie. visually, it IS the comics, with the white characters on black backgrounds being particularily striking (josh hartnett and marley shelton kissing, or clive owen sinking to his doom in tar). i've always been a fan of rodriguez's directing style, but here, it truly seems like he gave the camera to frank miller and said "you know this world, you direct it." and miller hit a homerun. i know, going into the movie, i was jazzed about QT's guest contribution and picking it out, but i got so enrapped in the movie that i forgot all about it. no scene screams "tarantino" or "rodriguez," but it all screams "miller." great work, frank.

and what a work it is. it looks great, sounds great, and is ably supported by a great team of actors. the standouts, for me, are mickey rourke as marv and bruce willis as hartigan. frank miller proclaimed that "rourke is Marv," and he's dead on in his assessment. but more than simply being faithful to the look and sound of marv (which, admittedly, any big guy could do a serviceable job), rourke captures the man's soul. and it's wounded, man. we feel his pain in the loss of goldie, his worries that he might be losing his sanity, and all his primal anger. but, under it all, rourke makes us see the essential good in marv. in a way, it's almost like rourke's harry angel; a hard, scarred, tough as nails SOB, but with a good soul nothing (and i mean NOTHING) can touch. rourke is back with a vengeance, and his performance should garner more acclaim than it probably will. and willis, for the first time since Unbreakable, seems really alive in his work. he's magnetic, restrained rather than bored, and so intense in his pursuit of justice (so much so that what he does, like much in this movie, might make you squeam) that you can take your eyes of him. he's weary, broken-down, and almost dead, but he knows what's right and will stop at nothing to do so. following his beyond-phoned it in work in Hostage, Willis's hartigan is one of his best roles ever, and hopefully he will start taking on more challenging roles. do not worry, any of you naysayers, because he is better than clint eastwood could have ever been.

but really no one in the cast is a slacker. clive owen's american accent is a little dodgy, but he captures dwight's righteous fury like a pro and is aces reading miller's hard-boiled voice overs. james king and carla gugino are badass as well, and are extremely hot and naked in this movie (especially gugino---damn!!! this gal needs to do us all a favor and pose for playboy because she is a goddess). devon aoki is the darth maul of this movie, and her swordwork might steal away the movie from everybody else if the rest of the movie wasn't so good. michael clarke duncan always fares best in bad guy roles, and scores here as well. rosario dawson is obviously having a blast as gail, relishing the chance to kill lots of people, dress like the hottest bondage girl you've ever seen, and make out with clive owen (in a non-sex scene that was as hot as any full nudity sexual romp i've ever seen). she seems happy to be having fun rather than languishing in Alexander.

josh hartnett--an underrated favorite of mine, and a blast in his small bad guy role. what's more, i totally geeked out at the presences of powers boothe (as senator roark) and rutger hauer (as cardinal roark). put these guys in more movies---especially hauer, who's magentic in his three minutes of screentime. plus, elijah wood, benicio del toro, and nick stahl are three of the sleaziest villians i've ever seen in the movies. del toro has the least screentime of the three, but his work is reminisent of young brando. really creepy, over-the-top, and loving every minute of it. the fact that he gives his all in a small role like this and blows a leading role in The Hunted really shows the faith he had in this project. between this and Bully, stahl is cornering the market on playing twisted young men, and it's a tribute to his skill that Junior is just as hideous before his "change" as he is after (although he's much much much more attractive before). and wood? i'm gonna say the least about him and leave it as a surprise for you to discover. all i'll say is that frodo baggins is dead, with this one performance, and wood IS simply terrifying and disturbing as kevin. hell, people in the audience were so unnerrved by him that they gasped EVERY TIME he came on screen.

before i get to the negatives, lemme assure you of two things.

1) the narration in the comics is still in the movie. i would say that probably 80% of it was kept, and it is terrific. owen, willis, and rourke all do a great job with it, and it enhances, rather than detracts from, the film. great stuff.

2) this movie is violent as hell. you have no idea unless you've read the comics, and even then you'll probably be surprised at how much rodriguez and miller have gotten away with. sure, they use some tricks like making blood yellow or white instead of red (at times; other times it's red as ever), but it's still one of the most graphically violent films i've ever seen. there are no clean wounds or slick violence in this film; it's all ragged and bloody and spurting and unclean and downright mean looking. the two grisly piece-de-resistances? hartigan's final confrontation with junior and marv's "little chat" with kevin. gore hounds are gonna cream themselves.

now the negatives. michael madsen is kinda wasted. after his work in Kill Bill, which is better than his Mr. Blonde, his work as Bob (hartigan's partner) is disappointing. sure, he has less to work with, but he just seems listless and bored (especially when acting alongside Willis). additionally, jessica alba's choice to keep her clothes on hurts the film rather than helps it. i'll admit, she's fine (acting-wise) as nancy, a lot better than i had thought and probably the best she's ever been in a movie, but when the rest of the female cast is so willing to be either naked or semi-nude (as is bruce willis), her refusal to do so stands out.

still, this is a movie to see, again and again, on its release date on april 1st. provided the MPAA doesn't cut it to shreds (and it might; the version we saw was unrated), this is the most faithful adaptation of a comic ever made. god bless frank miller, god bless robert rodriguez, and god bless the entire cast for getting behind this film.

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Old 03-17-2005, 03:24 PM
  #43
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Ooh glad to see a good review but it sounds insanely graphic ..
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Old 03-17-2005, 04:05 PM
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i know but my fav part was the one with that josh is in more than just the opening
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Old 03-18-2005, 06:32 AM
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