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Old 06-26-2005, 05:55 AM
  #46
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WP: I know that you've talked with famous actor Josh Hartnett.
JN: Josh Hartnett is an intense, sincere fellow. If I wasn't a dozen days older than his dad, he would be a fun friend but it was fun to meet him. His interest came from having a close friend whose cousin is autistic. He put a lot into his acting and was also a big force in finding financial backing and a director for the movie.


rest of the interview http://www.wrongplanet.net/modules.p...howpage&pid=99
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Old 06-27-2005, 09:44 AM
  #47
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I am excited for this movie. I love how he chooses such different roles for each one of his movies...
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Old 07-20-2005, 11:23 AM
  #48
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Here's a review posted on IMDB...

"I was privileged last week to get the opportunity to see 'Mozart and the Whale' in its entirety and I am very excited about the upcoming release.

It is not only the best picture about the autism spectrum since Rainman. It is far better than that, showing us a glimpse as it does of people on the spectrum living as part of the 'real world' - not confined to institutions or treated as patients.

I think - and hope that those outside the autism community get the chance to agree - that it's a well told human story which celebrates people with autism and presents their lives as, although different, lives just as rich as anyone elses.

Josh Harnett and Radha Mitchell do an admirable job, as do the supporting cast of others representing autistic people (for example the Greg character, who lives his life through his writings). The cinematography and editing, in the view of this amateur, non-movie-critic type, also outstanding.


I think Jerry and his screenwriting pals have done a service to the autism community and to society in general by allowing us to see into these lives. I hope my perspectives aren't too warped - as a parent of a 13 year old boy with autism - not to see the flaws, because I couldn't find any."

thanks to fanhost.com for that one
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Old 07-21-2005, 07:52 AM
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wow, Better than rainman, I really do hope this film gets the right amount of recognition... It sounds amazing... any idea on the release?
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Old 08-12-2005, 04:15 PM
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Another Mozart and the Whale review

First of all, I want to say that I absolutely loved it! As a parent of a
child with autism, I think the film did a beautiful job of creating characters that were real, complicated human beings; not disabled people to be pitied, but differently abled people to be celebrated. We rooted for them, all of them - we were on their side from early on. Your heart breaks when you see their
challenges and how vulnerable they can be, but you cheer their resilience and
ability to connect with each other against all odds.

My dream for my son is to grow up in a world that not only understands the different challenges of various disabilities, but accepts and appreciates him for who he is and what his
unique self has to offer the world. I think that this film is a funny, sad, heartwarming, heart-breaking, soaring testament to that ideal.

Now, on to specifics. I thought that the performances were wonderful. Josh Hartnett makes you forget the Hollywood hunk image and becomes that vulnerable character, trying to figure out a world that doesn't make sense -except when it comes down to numbers - but with a heart the size of Texas and a spirit that won't quit. Radha Mitchell is luminous as Isabelle. Her spirit, energy, and heart shine through. Though her character clearly has mental health issues beyond her autism, they are also a part of what makes her who she is. Her ability to accept herself and persevere - maybe sometimes perseverate - keeps you on her side and rooting for her.

A few of the performances of the support group members were outstanding as well. Sheila Kelley hits the perfect note - abrasive, tendency to fixate, but she is there and she somehow connects with these other people. Donald's best friend, the writer, is also quite good, as
are the others. I particularly liked a quick scene where the one member snatches a cookie - he is clearly quite challenged and can barely communicate - but then sits down and starts playing the piano beautifully. It's a small moment, but I think underscores the idea that all of these people have something to
offer the world, if the world can only see past their differences to appreciate
them.

I also particularly liked the scene where the group is deciding to go on a whale watch to cheer up Donald. The way that they latch onto this impossible scheme and stick with it, slowly raising their hands in support, is the very
definition of true friendship and so hard to find even among the so-called normal
population. The other theme that transcends disability issues is the struggle between Donald's desire to fit into the world and Isabelle's need to be herself at all costs - even when it means alienating the world and hurting other people.

The give and take of this journey is a universal struggle that anyone can relate to. Ultimately the film tackles human issues, not just disability issues, while raising so much needed awareness about autism and the people
behind the label.

This film has so much award potential - from the performances, to the writing, to the beautifully crafted direction. One last comment - please don't consider changing the title from "Mozart and the Whale" to "Crazy in Love."
"Mozart and the Whale" celebrates the unique spirit and talents of these special
people. "Crazy in Love" is just a glib play on words that flies in the face of everything the movie is trying to say. I think the disability community would turn against the film pretty quickly if it were misnamed in such a demeaning
way.

People on the autism spectrum, particularly young people, will be inspired by this story. "Mozart and the Whale" is a film that the autism community, the larger disability community, and the community at large can enjoy, be inspired by, and fall in love with together. That's not an easy feat! Thank you for taking such care in making this wonderful film!!

source:jocasta over at fanhost
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Old 08-18-2005, 05:43 AM
  #51
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Norway's Petter Naess directed 2001's "Elling," perhaps the first knee-slapping comedy featuring a schizophrenic narrator. His English-language debut is the Josh Hartnett-Radha Mitchell starrer "Mozart and the Whale," a love story about a man with Asperger's syndrome that Steven Spielberg originally was set to direct and which is set for an October release stateside.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr..._id=1001015232
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