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Old 04-06-2011, 03:24 PM
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Mildred Pierce thread #2: Because all the critics agreed that kate's performance was superb

Welcome to the 2nd mildred Pierce thread
Spoilers & Speculation

Cast

Kate Winslet ... Mildred Pierce
Evan Rachel Wood ... Veda Pierce
Guy Pearce ... Monty Beragon
Mare Winningham ... Ida Corwin
Melissa Leo ... Lucy Gessler
Brian F. O'Byrne ... Bert Pierce
James LeGros ... Wally Burgan
Morgan Turner ... Young Veda Pierce

Quote:
Kate Winslet told me she has been getting her hands dirty as she prepares to play Mildred Pierce, based strictly on the James M. Cain novel rather than the Joan Crawford movie version.

'When you first see Mildred, she's working in a restaurant kitchen, baking chicken pies. Then she does this for herself and runs her own business. I've been plucking chickens and preparing them for the pies,' the Oscar-winning actress told me at an Orange Bafta party hosted by Lancome and Harper's Bazaar at the St Martins Lane Hotel.

'I love doing it!' Kate told me as she demonstrated with her hands exactly what she did to those poor old chickens.

'It was the Depression,' Kate explained. 'People had to live - and eat.'

Guy Pearce and Evan Rachel Wood will also be in the drama, which Todd Haynes will direct for America's HBO TV.
Before shooting (and baking) begins, Kate's heading to LA for the Oscars on March 7, where she will be a major presenter.
Madonna signs Abbie Cornish up to her new film on Edward VIII's abdication | Mail Online

Quote:
HBO is finally confirming what’s been rumored for months: Oscar winner Kate Winslet will star in a five-hour miniseries adaptation of James M. Cain’s Depression-era novel Mildred Pierce.

Todd Haynes (Far From Heaven) is on board to direct the project, which finds Winslet playing a proud, single mother struggling to earn her daughter’s love during the Great Depression in middle-class Los Angeles.

The 1945 film version of Mildred Pierce netted Joan Crawford an Academy Award. It’s safe to say HBO’s remake will score Winslet her first Emmy.

Shooting begins in April in New York
It's official: Kate Winslet to headline HBO's 'Mildred Pierce' | Ausiello | EW.com

Quote:
Winslet Game for `Mildred Pierce'

By: Mike Fleming
Published: Thu, August 13, 2009, 3:08 PM
| Comments ( 1 ) | TrackBack ( 0 ) Email or Share

Kate Winslet is attached to "Mildred Pierce," a miniseries adaptation based on the James M. Cain novel that Todd Haynes is writing and directing. Sources said that HBO is the lead contender to get the mini, but payweb sources said no deal has been struck.

Cain's tale was famously turned into a 1945 film that won Joan Crawford an Oscar for the lead role of a bored housewife who gets into the restaurant business, an enterprise that leads to back-stabbing, romance and murder.

The involvement of Winslet--right after her Oscar-winning performance in "The Reader" and her work in "Revolutionary Road"--underscores how much paywebs like HBO have become prestige venues for films that might vanish as theatrical releases, a fact underscored by the success of "Grey Gardens," which garnered Emmy noms for Drew Barrymore and Jessica Lange.

Haynes directed "I'm Not There," "Safe" and "Far From Heaven
BFDealmemo on Variety.com

Quote:
Mare Winningham has landed the last major role on HBO's miniseries "Mildred Pierce."

In pilot-casting news, Lizzy Caplan is set as a lead on CBS' comedy "True Love," and Sharon Leal has scored a lead on the CW drama "Hellcats."

"Pierce," Todd Haynes' five-hour miniseries based on James M. Cain's noir novel, stars Kate Winslet as Mildred Pierce Beragon, a wife who separates from her unemployed husband (Brian F. O'Byrne) and takes a job as a waitress while struggling to earn her daughter's (Evan Rachel Wood ) love in Los Angeles during the Great
Mare Winningham joins HBO's 'Pierce'

Quote:
Having served as maid — and romantic rival — for Strindberg’s Miss Julie this season in Patrick Marber’s update for Broadway (After Miss Julie), Marin Ireland has signed up for another stretch of servitude, picking up after Mildred Pierce in a five-hour HBO miniseries that allows the Oscared Kate Winslet to take a whack at the long-suffering mother role that won Joan Crawford her little gold man.

“No, I’m not Veda,” she hastened to add. “Evan Rachel Wood is playing Veda so that will be exciting. I’m playing Lottie, who’s their maid-slash-assistant baker.”

It was news to her that her role was played by the daft and squeaky Butterfly McQueen (“Prissy” in Gone With the Wind ), but she bounced back with panache: “I play very against type all the time so I feel this is sorta in keeping with my policy.”

Guy Pearce, Mare Winningham, James LeGros and Brian F. O’Byrne co-star in the roles originated by Zachary Scott, Eve Arden, Jack Carson and Bruce Bennett in the 1945 flick. Arden and Ann Blyth (as the problematic Veda) earned their only Oscar nominations here, supporting La Crawford. Blyth soon evolved into sweeter roles.

The miniseries remake is being directed by Todd Haynes (Far From Heaven).
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Mildred Pierce (starring Kate Winslet) is filming near Madison Square Park today too (around W 25th and Broadway) 8 minutes ago via web
Twitter / olv: Mildred Pierce (starring K ...

Quote:
Kate Winslet was out walking about NYC on Sunday with a worried look on her face while filming her new movie Mildred Pierce. Since splitting from her husband Sam Mendes, Kate’s getting back to work by playing a divorced single mother in the film. She’ll probably have a lot to bring to the role!

Kate and Sam have been maintaining a relationship since their split and have been spotted in NYC taking care of their kids.

Kate is now getting back to work, but kind of doubt this role will really help to take her mind off of things!
Kate Winslet Plays Her Divorced Single Mother Part Well | OK! Magazine - The First for Celebrity News

Quote:
Getting back to work on the set of Mildred Pierce, Kate Winslet was spotted in Queens, New York City on Wednesday (May 26).

Decked out in full wardrobe, the Academy Award winning actress got herself into character and knocked out several scenes for the upcoming film.

In related news, Ms. Winslet missed a day of filming because she acquired an enormous bruise while playing basketball with her kids, Mia and Joe.

A source told the New York Post, “She fell after being hit by a basketball and suffered bruising that couldn’t be covered with make-up, so the entire production was halted on Monday.” …
Kate Winslet: Back in work mode

Quote:
Evan Rachel Woods and co-star Kate Winslet film their new HBO miniseries, Mildred Pierce, Uptown Manhattan and Queens on Thursday (May 27).

In the 1930s-set drama, Kate stars as the title character, a single mother in middle-class Los Angeles during the Great Depression who is trying to earn her daughter’s love. Todd Haynes (I’m Not There) is directing.

15+ pictures inside of Evan Rachel Wood and Kate Winslet filming Mildred Pierce…
Evan Rachel Wood & Kate Winslet Shoot Mildred Pierce | Evan Rachel Wood, Kate Winslet : Just Jared

Quote:
Mildred Pierce, HBO mini series with Kate Winslet, is filming on 175/176th streets and fort washington/broadway until as late as 3 AM about 23 hours ago via web.
Kate shoots “Mildred Pierce” yesterday

Quote:
Kate Winslet was snapped yesterday on the set of the new HBO miniseries, Mildred Pierce, where she plays a single mother in Los Angeles during the Great Depression who is struggling to win her daughter back.
Quote:
Evan Rachel Wood and fiance Marilyn Manson walk around the set of HBO’s Mildred Pierce in New York City on Friday (May 28).

Evan, 22, and Kate Winslet shot some scenes in Manhattan and Queens on Thursday.

The pair will be starring in a film together, entitled Splatter Sisters, which is set to be a “sexploitation-serial-killer-slasher-road-movie circa 1989.”

10+ pictures of Evan Rachel Wood and Marilyn Manson, the Mildred Pierce pair…
Evan Rachel Wood & Marilyn Manson: Mildred Pierce Pair | Evan Rachel Wood, Marilyn Manson : Just Jared

Production Stills







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Old 04-06-2011, 03:57 PM
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tftnt Fatima the OP looks great got so much information
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Old 04-07-2011, 03:39 AM
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Thanks for the new thread!
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Old 04-07-2011, 05:51 AM
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τfnt!
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Old 04-07-2011, 09:40 AM
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TFTNT!

This miniseries is amazing!
Kate once again proves that she's a great actress
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Old 04-07-2011, 02:07 PM
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You're welcome everyone

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“Mildred Pierce” brings noir back to television

There just aren’t many noir films being made today. Sure, Quentin Tarantino borrows heavily from the genre and some films incorporate an occasional throwback reference, but overall, the heavy-handed dialogue of smooth talking Humphrey Bogart-like characters, the harsh lighting and the mysterious, often gruesome, plotlines have been replaced by the more contemporary trends of understated acting, 3-D gimmicks and whatever you’d like to call the phenomenon that is Michael Bay.

Mildred Pierce, a five-part HBO miniseries directed by Todd Haynes starring Kate Winslet in the title role, tries to prove, however, that noir still has a place in the 21st century.

The series is set in Depression-era Los Angeles, and the story follows Mildred Pierce as she experiences the challenges of being a single mother trying to provide for her family in a time of staggering gender imbalances. The series is based on James M. Cain’s 1941 book of the same name, which was previously adapted into a 1945 film noir that won Joan Crawford the Academy Award for Best Actress.

While Mildred is a far more human character in the miniseries than in the somewhat misogynistic noir film, the miniseries does borrow heavily from the previous adaptation in terms of acting, lighting and mise en scène. This style has mixed results, however. At first, the noir-style dialogue comes off as stilted, making it feel like an Arthur Miller play is being acted out on screen. It is eventually possible to adjust, however, from contemporary expectations for the dialogue and to become comfortable with the reliable noir cadence.

The series explores the themes of gender inequality and class struggle as Mildred is forced to work a dreaded “uniform job,” as she describes it. First working as a waitress, she eventually tries to elevate herself to the upper class by opening her own chicken and waffles restaurant. The plot is driven by the conflict between Mildred and her various love interests and by the relationship between Mildred and her ridiculously highbrow 14-year-old daughter who resents the family’s middle-class status.

Veda Pierce, played in her younger incarnation by Morgan Turner and later by Evan Rachel Wood, is the most hilariously unbelievable character in the series. Her first line is in French and her subsequent dialogue is peppered with references to Emily Brontë and Chopin. She comes across as an intellectual, erudite version of the terrorizing tot in The Bad Seed (1956), scrutinizing her mother and providing obnoxiously enlightened commentary on Mildred’s life decisions.

Veda is mirrored by the character of Monty Beragon, a deviant playboy played by the smooth-talking Guy Pearce of The King’s Speech (2010) and Memento (2001). Monty and Veda both judge Mildred for lowering herself to the working class and are off-putting almost to the point of being unbearable.

Thankfully, they are balanced out by the lovely performance by Melissa Leo of The Fighter (2010), as a wise, fast-talking friend to Mildred. Leo provides much-needed comedic relief, and she brings the noir dialogue alive more than most of the actors with whom she shares the screen.

Despite a slow start and the occasional ridiculous dialogue, the story picks up steam by part two of the series and it eventually becomes possible to identify with Winslet’s character as she struggles to find her place in the world.

Although pacing is not the series’ strong point, there are plenty of enjoyable moments to be had in this world if you’re patient enough to find them. The main pitfalls of the series occur when the overacting is pushed too far and instead of empathizing with the characters, we can only laugh at them.

Thus far, though, the series is generally charming and engaging. By reinvigorating an antiquated genre, Mildred Pierce succeeds in creating a rich, warm, old-fashioned world that soaks us into Mildred’s reality in the same spirit of noir films of the past.
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Old 04-07-2011, 04:05 PM
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thanks for the article Fatima i found this bit interesting

Despite a slow start and the occasional ridiculous dialogue, the story picks up steam by part two of the series and it eventually becomes possible to identify with Winslet’s character as she struggles to find her place in the world.

its maybe hard to identify with her reasonings and her beliefs but its only been 3 parts so far so her character will begin to unravel
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Old 04-08-2011, 05:19 AM
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Kate is one of my most favorite Actress in the world and i have seen her acting in Various Roles but i like her mother role so much and yes i am agree with your statement she is one of the best actress in the world and no one can compare her because she is the best
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Old 04-08-2011, 05:58 AM
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Agree with that, sidramalik100! Have you seen 'Mildred Pierce'?

Thanks for that article, Fatima.
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Old 04-08-2011, 06:24 PM
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sidramalik100, I agree with you. Kate does the mother role so well. She's incredibly convincing. What's your favourite Kate performance?
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Old 04-10-2011, 08:30 AM
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Quote:
Kate Winslet interviews “Mildred Pierce” director Todd Haynes

Painstakingly constructed settings are usually reserved for epic science fiction fantasies where directors have unparalleled freedom to create digital environments, but there are no superheroes in a Todd Haynes film — just empathetic, flawed human beings acting out their lives in minute period detail. Haynes became a cult icon when his 43-minute short film Superstar (1987), the tragic saga of anorexic pop star Karen Carpenter told using Barbie dolls, was banned from circulation because of copyright issues. (Bootleg copies can still be viewed on YouTube.) Haynes, who was born in Los Angeles in 1961, has been tweaking societal conventions ever since. As a pivotal member of the New Queer Cinema movement, he enraged conservative politicians with frank depictions of gay sex in Poison (1991), then upended his own audience’s expectations four years later, with the jarring hypochondriac drama Safe (1995). Subsequent films such as Velvet Goldmine (1998), Far From Heaven (2002), and I’m Not There (2007) manage to embrace both experimental and formal aims, like academic theses wrapped in sweeping, melodramatic arcs. Throughout his career, the director has explored how women have navigated visible and invisible levers of power. “I’m drawn to female characters,” he tells Kate Winslet, his self-professed “other Coen brother” and star and co-producer of his new HBO miniseries, Mildred Pierce. “And not all of them are strong characters.” Airing this spring, the five-part miniseries tells the story based on the novel by James M. Cain, of a resilient but imperfect woman who struggles to raise a family in Great Depression–era Los Angeles. Winslet recently spoke with Haynes, who was at his home in Portland, Oregon, about, among other things, Mildred Pierce, why he’s never made a film set in the contemporary world, and the challenge of letting things go.

KATE WINSLET: Do you remember the experience of watching your first ever movie?

TODD HAYNES: I do. I was 3 years old and it was Mary Poppins [1964] and it made an impression on me that was seismic, apparently. I fell into some kind of total creative, imaginative rapture over that movie that propelled this industry of Mary Poppins drawings, plays, performances—just an obsessive, creative reaction to it.

WINSLET: Do you think that your expectations for movies beyond that moment were amplified?

HAYNES: Yes.

WINSLET: So did you subsequently feel let down if something didn’t give you that same internal punch?

HAYNES: No, I don’t think I was let down. Other movies along the way would seize me in similar ways and would usher in a whole new phase of sort of obsessional interests. After Mary Poppins, it was probably the [Franco] Zeffirelli Romeo and Juliet in ’68. I was 7, and it completely blew my mind and I went into this sort of Shakespeare obsessional period. And then later, movies like The Miracle Worker [1962] or Anne of the Thousand Days [1969]. A lot of them, interestingly, were English in setting and subject [laughs] whatever that means. What was your first one? Do you remember?

WINSLET: The first film that I remember having a really profound impact on me was The Red Balloon [1956].

HAYNES: Oh wow, that’s a cool one.

WINSLET: I know. I’m kind of proud of how cool that is. [laughs] But the reason why I remember watching it is because I was ill off school and I was at home and my dad was with me, taking care of me, and it was just on television. It was the experience of sitting and having that one-to-one, very special time with my dad. I was one of four siblings, and so one-to-one time happened very rarely with either parent. And particularly not with my father, because he was always out working, whether he was working for a tarmac firm, or the postman, or doing whatever he did to make ends meet. Or acting jobs, which were very few and far between anyway. And just recently, because I remembered that experience, I sat down and watched The Red Balloon with both Mia and Joe and they both were moved to tears by it. They really grasped the concept, that just one thing, so unique and so beautiful can make you so happy and change your entire perspective of the world and your day-to-day existence. Would you like to direct a film set in more contemporary times and is there a specific reason why that hasn’t happened in your career?

HAYNES: I continue to think about historical moments and periods as inspiration and subject matter, and yet, everything that occurs to me has some relationship to what’s going on today. I guess I’ve always felt that when you see material through a frame — and for me that period or that historical setting is a frame — it allows a viewer to make their own connections to why it’s relevant.

WINSLET: I’m realizing that you really only make a project once every what, four years? Five years?

HAYNES: [laughs] Something like that, yeah.

WINSLET: Someone like [Steven] Soderbergh is known for working at a fairly fast pace and that works for him, and Baz Luhrmann is known for working on the opposite end of that spectrum. Where do you feel you fall?

HAYNES: I think it’s due to the dogged single-mindedness that seems to be required for me to produce something as complex and demanding as a film, especially ones I’ve written and directed. And as an independent filmmaker, to develop the money and the financing and the structure and the whole process, and then promoting them and traveling with them, which is a part of the process that I’ve always enjoyed and I’ve learned a great deal from. I really do like seeing it all through, starting from the very beginning, which often entails years of research on a subject. Someone like the Bob Dylan subject for I’m Not There required what I felt was almost a dissertation on somehow trying to get close to encompassing his life and story and the historical influences that affected him and his work and all of that. I feel like I’m the same with the sort of glam era for Velvet Goldmine, and all the various artists and influences that produced that moment. So yeah, it becomes a kind of totalizing experience for me, and it doesn’t ever feel like there are big, long periods of inactivity between projects, it just feels like that’s the necessary lifespan of a single work, when you’re really the person generating it.

WINSLET: When you were a child, did you always want to direct? Did you ever consider doing anything else? Was there another passing fad or anything?

HAYNES: It was kind of a big bubble of interest in the arts in general, and in visual art all along, drawing and painting and stuff, but I always loved theater and acting in plays and directing, writing little plays and directing friends in plays. And I think when I was about 6 or 7, I would have said I wanted to be an actor and an artist. And that just kind of kept honing itself around film and getting closer to film. I remember seeing The Graduate [1967] when I was a kid, and as I became more sophisticated and began to see films, all the films that were coming out in the late ’60s and early ’70s were evoking a kind of zeitgeist of the times… the excitement of how a lens can tell a story and what was possible and a new sensibility about how to tell stories visually were as much about what you excluded from the frame as what you included. There was a new minimalism and a new shorthand in visual language that I remember feeling so stimulated by, like, through my entire body, and I would walk around looking at the world literally through frames. I think by around the time I was about 8 or 9, the idea of filmmaking probably took hold. I made little Super 8 extravaganzas when I was a kid, the first being my own version of Romeo and Juliet, and where I played all the parts except for Juliet. My mom even shot a Super 8 test roll in double exposure, because I wasn’t sure if I could find a good Juliet, so I dressed up as Juliet.

WINSLET: “I wasn’t sure if I could find a good Juliet.” [laughs] I love the exacting standards, even in an 8 year old.

HAYNES: There’s this footage of me as Romeo on one side of the frame, and pop, I pop on as Juliet on the other, in drag.

WINSLET: How about some of your early experiences of working with actors? Do you remember being struck by how unpredictable that can be?

HAYNES: I remember probably more vividly the experience of making my first feature, Poison, which was done in New York City, because we needed such a range of acting styles, so we put ads in Back Stage magazine and interviewed tons and tons of working theater actors, and it was a combination of people who’d worked in film, people who’d worked in theater, complete newcomers, and not actors, and that process was so rich and exciting and interesting, and we literally, at one point in the film, wanted a bum off the street, and we went to the Bowery and we pulled this guy up into our office and paid him to play this sort of perverse Jean Genet–influenced angel, and shot him in a couple hours, and then sent him on his way with some money in his pocket… But I don’t think it’s until you learn, until you work with nonprofessionals, and get good stuff out of that process that I think you really understand the whole range of what’s possible and how there is no single style of acting. And there is no single approach that actors take to their craft. And the best thing you learn is that you have to really listen and respect each actor’s own process and own method, and that takes a kind of delicate, you know, non-imposing patience and openness, I think, to get the very best out of the people you work with.

WINSLET: Hey, we were fortunate that we got along, Todd.

HAYNES: Oh my god, Kate, can you imagine? I mean it really worked out, so I felt like I had my other Coen brother, you know? [both laugh]

WINSLET: Oh my god! That’s such a huge compliment, that has to go into this piece. Okay, some of your movies feature women as the protagonist. Do you think that you are particularly drawn to strong female characters?

HAYNES: I’m drawn to female characters, not all of them are strong characters. I think I’m drawn to female characters partly because they don’t have as easy or as obvious a relationship to power in society, and so they suffer under social constraints or have to maneuver within them in ways men sometimes don’t, or are unconscious about, or have certain liberties that are invisible to them. And those accesses to power are never invisible, they’re always a struggle. The ways that those sort of ambiguities are internalized are extremely interesting to me as well. Mildred Pierce is such an amazing example, because unlike most domestic dramas, where it’s about women contained within very rigid domestic settings and suppressed by their role as wife or mother, this is a woman thrust out into the world, newly single, with two kids to raise in the Depression in Los Angeles who has to find her way. And the way she functions, her unbelievable skills and drive and industry as a person and how her own, even emotional pathologies around her daughter get translated into productive work and amazing success and all of that, I just find an unusual female character and story and one I’d never really encountered before. I think it’s very rare in the pantheon of women’s films and women’s stories. I mean, you’ve played a lot of different characters with unique, surprising strength and grit and access to their desire and erotic sides and so forth, but I don’t know if you’ve ever played someone exactly like this.

WINSLET: No, I haven’t at all. One thing I realized as we were shooting was that Mildred has so much strength, but also so much weakness that she learns how to disguise and moderate. And at the same time, her weakness does come out. Somehow she manages to turn those weaknesses into strengths, or projections onto her other relationships — in particular, her relationship with Veda [Mildred's daughter, played by Evan Rachel Wood]. It’s her strongest point and her weakest point.

HAYNES: Absolutely.

WINSLET: She knows how to raise that kid, she knows what she believes in, she knows what she wants for that child, but her weakness, her massive Achilles’ heel is the fact that she loves her to a fault, that she can’t help herself and also wishes on some level that she too could be like that kid.

HAYNES: Yes.

WINSLET: Which is not a good thing for a parent to feel.

HAYNES: No.

WINSLET: And obviously, it ultimately came back to become one of the single most destructive things in her life.

HAYNES: Yeah, but along the way, becomes this incredibly productive thing.

WINSLET: Yes.

HAYNES: And on both sides of that spectrum it’s stuff she doesn’t see. I think it’s so interesting when characters don’t see things in themselves, because it actually again asks the audience to see for them and to see things they don’t see yet and it creates a really empathetic relationship and then that’s something that creates an element of suspense throughout this story, because she’s so capable, she’s so extraordinary in so many ways, and there are many things she does see or does come to learn about herself. But then the most persistent, or the most sort of ravaging, are the ones she doesn’t see until the end.

WINSLET: I want to talk about what has been the most difficult film for you to let go of emotionally, because I know as an actor there are key ones for me, but I wonder if it’s the same for a director.

HAYNES: Each one becomes such a total physical immersion and I’m sure a kind of psychic development of my own self as I go through those films. By the time I finished Poison, the New Queer Cinema was branded and I was associated with this. In many ways it formed me as a filmmaker, like as a feature filmmaker I never set out to be. I figured I would be teaching my whole life and making experimental films on the side. In many ways, the emergence that New Queer Cinema designated was an audience that had always been part of the art house audience but was suddenly distinguished as gay or queer or whatever, and that became a way to generate a product for this new audience that was aware, that was politicized, that was obviously literate and culturally savvy. And they could take films that were different and were challenging and were trying out different things. But by the same token, I was so eager to move on from it and do something quite different in my second film, Safe, with Julianne Moore. We would take it to gay film festivals because it was the second film by the gay filmmaker or whatever and people were like, “What the **** is this?”

WINSLET: Yeah.

HAYNES: I found that film to be just as much an indictment of hetero-normative society as Poison was, but without gay characters as the subjects. It was still coming from me. It was still my perspective, it just didn’t have sexy abs in it, you know what I mean? I guess I fancied that I was ready to move on from these films, and in fact you never really are. They’re things you create, they’re things you love in different ways and they never leave you.

WINSLET: This is my last question.

HAYNES: All right.

WINSLET: You haven’t always been in a position to have a rehearsal period on films, but we spent almost two weeks on Mildred. Were you surprised by the ways in which that may have helped you? Do you think you would like to repeat the rehearsal process on set?

HAYNES: Oh god, absolutely! Wasn’t it incredible? It was so essential for something this massive. Five-and-a-half hours of dramatic material, and a ten-year span of a character’s life that we were shooting every which way, as always in low-budget filmmaking. It was so psychically grounding. The kinds of work that started to happen in those sessions continued to develop, even when you weren’t with other actors, but it planted seeds that continued to take root and grow throughout the process. Having the idea of rehearsals made me think I could do everything in the rehearsal time, and basically, we never left the table. But there was so much to discuss and so much to deal with just at the level of text and the level of character and backstory and relationships that aren’t depicted, and exchanges that don’t come out in the actual scenes in the film, but that provide their backstory. It creates a history, you know, that you carry with you, and keep applying, on camera.

WINSLET: I thought it was particularly important for the children because it’s so intimidating. Knowing that you’re playing a big character and you’re going to have to learn your lines and be in a room with all these people who, you know, apparently know what they’re doing. One of the things that we were both able to share with them is how important mistakes are. And how we love mistakes.

HAYNES: Yeah, the misspeakings and fumblings and mumblings are these characters.

WINSLET: But we really did want to know: What did they think their character would do? What would they do at home sitting round a dinner table? Would they reach across to grab the orange juice jug? Little things like that made a big difference because, of course, it did move so fast when we got into the room and they felt as though anything that they did was of value to the whole project.

HAYNES: There’s a real family life, you know, buzzing along, on camera. It’s really extraordinary. Kate!

WINSLET: There you go, babe.

Kate Winslet is an Academy Award–Winning Actress who stars in the title role of Mildred Pierce.
Kate Winslet Fan|Your #1 resource for everything Ms. Winslet

Quote:
Guy Pearce: “Winslet sex scenes were naughty”

Guy Pearce has described his on-screen sex scenes with Kate Winslet in Mildred Pierce as “naughty”.

The actor — Winslet’s love interest Monty Beragon in the HBO mini-series — confessed that he felt nervous about the intimate acts as it is never easy to get naked in front of the camera.

“[The sex scenes] are pretty naughty,” he told PopEater. “When you work with someone like Todd [Haynes, director] and Kate, they’re all about integrity, but there’s always that little voice in your head that says, ‘Okay, here I go, I’m taking my clothes off’.”

He went on to say that, while he has always stayed in shape, he felt that having a dark tan was the key to looking good in the final product.

“Well, I worked on it. I exercise a lot anyway. I’ve always been thin, so keeping him thin and appropriate for the period wasn’t too hard,” he explained. “Also obviously once you get a tan, everyone looks 50 times fitter than they really are. It was all about working on the tan.”

Pearce previously admitted to having a crush on Winslet for many years prior to working with her on Mildred Pierce.

He recently claimed that he saved her life during filming when a car they were driving nearly collided with a delivery truck.
Kate Winslet Fan�����|�����Your #1 resource for everything Ms. Winslet]Kate Winslet Fan�����|�����Your #1 resource for everything Ms. Winslet]Kate Winslet Fan|Your #1 resource for everything Ms. Winslet
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Old 04-13-2011, 01:39 AM
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Thanks for that, Fatima. Kate sounds like a great interviewer. Many interesting things in there.
Has anybody seen the last two episodes? I'm downloading them, but I wanna know whether the chemistry between Evan and Kate was good.
I still haven't read the book. I will start reading it after I'm done with the books I already read.
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Old 04-13-2011, 06:43 AM
  #13
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thanks for posting all that Fatima it was really interesting I liked that Kate was asking the questions

halfway through part 3 right now taking time to watch it but I still like it a lot im not normally one for drama
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Old 04-13-2011, 07:42 AM
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I haven't downloaded everything yet. I need to watch it all in one go.

I think what I want to do is download everything and watch it on DVD. I can't watch it on my computer screen.
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Old 04-13-2011, 07:44 AM
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yeh i was waiting till it had all aired then watch it all in one go makes more sense then I wont foget anything
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