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Old 09-20-2005, 08:15 AM
  #1
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Andie's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 58,330
Glossary for Definition of Forensic Terms #1 (Updated: 03/30/2006)

Woe, that's a great idea for a thread K Thanks for starting it. I hopefully come up with some more terms maybe while reading Kathy Reichs books


Last update: The Priest in the Churchyard (03/28/2007):

Ac•o•nite
n.
Any of various, usually poisonous perennial herbs of the genus Aconitum, having tuberous roots, palmately lobed leaves, blue or white flowers with large hoodlike upper sepals, and an aggregate of follicles.

A•cro•mi•on (ə-krō'mē-ən)
n., pl. -mi•a (mē-ə).
The outer end of the scapula to which the collarbone is attached.

ACUTE LEUKEMIAS are characterized by the rapid growth of immature blood cells. This crowding makes the bone marrow unable to produce healthy blood cells. Acute forms of leukemia can occur in children and young adults. (In fact, it is a more common cause of death for children in the US than any other type of malignant disease). Immediate treatment is required in acute leukemias due to the rapid progression and accumulation of the malignant cells, which then spill over into the bloodstream and spread to other organs of the body. If left untreated, the patient will die within months or even weeks.

ADIPOCERE - Grave wax, or adipocere, is a crumbly white, waxy substance that accumulates on those parts of the body that contain fat - the cheeks, breasts, abdomen and buttocks. It is the product of a chemical reaction in which fats react with water and hydrogen in the presence of bacterial enzymes, breaking down into fatty acids and soaps. Adipocere is resistant to bacteria and can protect a corpse, slowing further decomposition. Adipocere starts to form within a month after death and has been recorded on bodies that have been exhumed after 100 years. If a body is readily accessible to insects, adipocere is unlikely to form.

ALVEOLI - anatomical structures in the lung that have the form of a hollow cavity. They are the primary sites of gas exchange with the blood.

An•ky•lo•sis also an•chy•lo•sis (ăng'kə-lō's*s)
n.
Anatomy. The consolidation of bones or their parts to form a single unit.
Pathology. The stiffening and immobility of a joint as the result of disease, trauma, surgery, or abnormal bone fusion.

ANTHRACENE - a solid polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon consisting of three benzene rings derived from coal-tar. Anthracene is used in wood preservatives, insecticides, and coating materials.

A•que•ous
adj.
1. Relating to, similar to, containing, or dissolved in water; watery.
2. Geology. Formed from matter deposited by water, as certain sedimentary rocks.

Aramid
Aramid fiber (1961) is a fire-resistant and strong synthetic fiber . It is used in aerospace and military applications, for "bullet-proof" body armor fabric , and as an asbestos substitute. The term is a shortened form of " aromatic polyamide ".
A well-known type of aramid fiber (a para -aramid nylon ) is commonly known by its DuPont trade name, Kevlar , or Teijin trade name Twaron. It was developed by Stephanie Kwolek . An especially fireproof meta variant is Nomex .

Ar•chae•on or Ar•chae•on (är'kē-ŏn')
n. , pl.ar•chae•a (-kē-ə).
Any of various single-celled prokaryotes genetically distinct from bacteria, often thriving in extreme environmental conditions.

ARTHROPODS – a phylum of animals that includes an incredibly diverse group of taxa such as insects, crustaceans, spiders, scorpions, and centipedes. There are far more species of arthropods than species in all other phyla combined, and the number of undescribed species in the largest assemblage of arthropods, the insects, probably numbers in the tens of millions.

ASSYRIAN – from Assyria, an ancient empire in Mesopotamia. The Assyrian kings controlled a large kingdom at three different times in history. The most powerful and best-known nation of these periods is the Neo-Assyrian kingdom, 911-612 BC.

AVULSION FRACTURE - the detachment of a bone fragment that results from the pulling away of a ligament, tendon, or joint capsule from its point of attachment on a bone.

BALLISTIC FINGERPRINTING - a sub-category of firearms examination, is a forensic method that may help to find the gun that was used in a crime by matching the bullet's striations (or striae) with the rifled barrel through which it was fired in certain cases. Rifling, which first made an appearance in the 18 th century, is the process of making grooves in gun barrels that imparts a spin to the projectile for increased accuracy and range. Bullets fired from rifled weapons acquire a distinct signature of grooves, scratches, and indentations, which are somewhat unique to the weapon used. Brennan’s theory of reverse-engineering a bullet’s striations from the marks it leaves in bone is, at this time, entirely hypothetical.

Ben•zo•phe•none
n.
A white crystalline compound, C6H5COC6H6, used in perfumery and in
medicine. Also called diphenylketone.

Betadine
Betadine is the name of a consumer-available antiseptic used to treat minor cuts on mammals. Betadine is also used to prepare the skin prior to surgery, as it is a strong broad-spectrum topical microbicide. It is a povidone - iodine solution, used as a broad spectrum topical microbicide . Most over-the-counter solutions are 10% povidone-iodine.

BLACKBEARD - was the most notorious pirate in the history of seafaring. Thought to have been a native of England, he was using the name Edward Teach when he began pirating sometime after 1713. By mid-1717, he was among the most feared pirates of his day. Because of its shallow sounds and inlets, North Carolina's Outer Banks became a haven for many of these outlaws. Blackbeard was eventually tracked down to Ocracoke Inlet, North Carolina by the Royal Navy and killed in a brief but bloody battle on November 22, 1718. On the night before the final battle, one of Blackbeard’s crew asked him if his wife knew where he had buried his treasure. He replied that “nobody but himself and the devil knew where it was, and the longest liver should take it all.” No large cache of gold or money has ever been found.

BOKOR – A houngan who practices black magic or Petro Voodoo.

BRASHER DOUBLOON - In 1787, Ephraim Brasher was granted a petition to mint copper coins in New York State. Soon afterwards he turned his attention from to designing and minting a few pattern gold doubloons. Brasher's hallmark was highly significant in authenticating coinage in early America; the official United States Mint was not fully functional until 1793. The famed 1787 Brasher gold doubloon exists in a total population of just seven examples.

Bul•wark
n.
1. A wall or embankment raised as a defensive fortification; a rampart.

BURSITIS – An inflammation of one of the bursae, the small, fluid–filled sacs that lubricate and cushion pressure points between your bones and the tendons and muscles near your joints. There are more than 150 in your body, helping your joints move with ease. When inflammation occurs, movement or pressure is painful.

C14 DATING - Radio-carbon dating is a method of obtaining age estimates on organic materials. It has been used to date samples as old as 50,000 years. Radioactive carbon, produced when nitrogen 14 is bombarded by cosmic rays in the atmosphere, drifts down to earth and is absorbed from the air by plants. Animals eat the plants and take C14 into their bodies. Humans in turn take carbon 14 into their bodies by eating both plants and animals. When a living organism dies, it stops absorbing C14 and the C14 that is already in the object begins to disintegrate. Scientists can use this fact to measure how much C14 has disintegrated and how much is left in the object. From this remainder, they can calculate the object’s age.

CADAVERIC SPASM - a muscle phenomenon in which some muscles of the body become stiff instantly, rather than in the usual two to eight hours normal rigor takes to develop. The reason for such rapid rigor mortis, usually, is the extreme exertion of the muscles during the act of dying, especially as can happen during a struggle.

Cal•cine
v., -cined, -cin•ing, -cines.
v.tr.
To heat (a substance) to a high temperature but below the melting or fusing point, causing loss of moisture, reduction or oxidation, and the decomposition of carbonates and other compounds.

CALCITONIN - a polypeptide hormone especially from the thyroid gland that tends to lower the level of calcium in the blood plasma.

CALIBRATION PHANTOM – a mathematically-generated image which aids in determining standards for quantitative measurement.

Cal•i•per
n.
An instrument consisting essentially of two curved hinged legs, used to measure thickness and distances. Often used in the plural.

CAPTITATE – the largest of the wrist bones.

Ca•rot•id
n.
Either of the two major arteries, one on each side of the neck, that carry
blood to the head.

CASU CONSULTO – Latin for “Accidentally on Purpose.”

Ces•sa•tion
n.
A bringing or coming to an end; a ceasing: a cessation of hostilities.

CETIC ANHYDRIDE – (organic chemistry) (CH3CO)2O A liquid with a pungent odor that combines with water to form acetic acid; used as an acetylating agent.

CHALCOGENS - The chalcogens are the name for the periodic table group 16 in the periodic table. It is sometimes known as the oxygen family. It consists of the elements oxygen (O), sulfur (S), selenium (Se), tellurium (Te), the radioactive polonium (Po), and the synthetic ununhexium (Uuh).

Chem•i•lu•mi•nes•cence (kĕm'ə-lū'mə-nĕs'əns)
n.
Emission of light as a result of a chemical reaction at environmental temperatures.

CHIRONIMIDAE – Chironomids undergo a complete metamorphosis, including a larva, pupa, and adult stage. They will live in the larva stage, on or near the bottom of a lake, for up to two years before turning into pupa to begin their migration to the surface to hatch into adults. Trout feed on chironomid larva, pupa, and adults.

CHLORDIAZEPOXIDE – A drug used to relieve anxiety and to control agitation caused by alcohol withdrawal. Can be habit–forming.

Cil•i•ate (s*l'ē-*t, -āt')
adj.
Ciliated.
n.
Any of various protozoans of the class Ciliata, characterized by numerous cilia.

Civitas
Lat: in the Roman Law, a group of people living under the same laws; citizenship, state, commonwealth, community.

THE CODE OF CONDUCT (CoC) - is the guide for the behavior of military members who are captured by hostile forces. In six brief Articles it addresses those situations and decision areas that, to some degree, all military personnel could encounter.

Article Six reads as follows: I will never forget that I am an American, fighting for freedom, responsible for my actions, and dedicated to the principles which made my country free. I will trust in my God and in the United States of America.

COFFIN-LOWRY SYNDROME - a rare genetic disorder characterized by craniofacial (head and facial) and skeletal abnormalities, mental retardation, short stature, and decreased muscle tone.

COLLES’ FRACTURE – a specific type of broken wrist, that is, a break across the end of the main bone of the forearm (the radius). A Colles' fracture is most commonly found after falling on to an outstretched hand.

Com•pa•zine
A trademark for the drug prochlorperazine.

Co•nid•i•o•phore
n.
A specialized fungal hypha that produces conidia

Cop•tic (kŏp't*k)
adj.
Of or relating to the Copts, the Coptic Church, or the Coptic language.

CORONAL SUTURE - a suture extending across the skull between the parietal and frontal bones.

COYOTE AND GPS COLLAR – To investigate how coyotes move and use space, wildlife biologists outfit them with radio collars equipped with global-positioning system (GPS) receivers, which use satellite transmissions to pinpoint an animal's location to within a few feet. This approach allows for more meaningful investigations into coyote movement patterns and the internal anatomy of their home ranges, giving a clearer picture of the coyote population.

Cra•ni•o•cer•e•bral
adj.
Of or relating to both the cranium and the cerebrum.

Cre•ta•ceous
adj.
Of or belonging to the geologic time, system of rocks, and sedimentary deposits of the third and last period of the Mesozoic Era, characterized by the development of flowering plants and ending with the sudden extinction of the dinosaurs and many other forms of life.

Cryp•to•spor•id•i•um
n.
A protozoan of the genus Cryptosporidium that is an intestinal parasite in humans and other vertebrates and sometimes causes diarrhea that is especially severe in immunocompromised individuals.

CUNEIFORM – The earliest writing in Mesopotamia, invented by the Sumerians, and drawn on clay tablets using long reeds. The name cuneiform is derived from two Latin words: cuneus, which means "wedge," and forma, which means "shape." Similar to but more abstract than Egyptian hieroglyphics, it eventually developed into a syllabic alphabet under the Semites (Assyrians and Babylonians) who came to dominate the area.

Cy•to•plasm
n.
The protoplasm outside the nucleus of a cell.

D’ALEMBERT EQUATION – Seeking to use mathematics to describe a vibrating string (such as that of a musical instrument), Jean le Rond d'Alembert formulated an important partial differential equation which generally describes all kinds of waves, such as sound waves, light waves and water waves.

DIARRHETIC, Diarrhœtic – (Med.) Producing diarrhea, or a purging.

DIATOMACEOUS EARTH – This is a geological deposit made up of crushed fossilized skeletons of siliceous marine and fresh water organisms, particularly diatoms and other algae. These skeletons are made of hydrated amorphous silica or opal. Crushed to a fine powder and observed through a microscope, the particles resemble bits of broken glass

Didinium -
The Didinium belongs to the Phyllum Ciliophora. They are from 80-200 um long.Didinium are fast moving carnivorous protozoans that feed almost exclusively on live Paramecium.

Dino•flag•el•late (dī'nō-flăj'ə-l*t, -lāt', -flə-jĕl'*t)
n.
Any of numerous minute, chiefly marine protozoans of the order Dinoflagellata, characteristically having two flagella and a cellulose covering and forming one of the chief constituents of plankton. They include bioluminescent forms and forms that produce red tide.

Dis-cern-ment
A term used in the Catholic Church, and other Christian traditions to describe the process of ascertaining God's will for one's life. In most contexts (in Catholicism), it describes the interior search for an answer to the question of one's vocation, namely, determining whether or not God is calling one to the religious life (the life of a brother, for males or sisterhood, for females) or priesthood.

DISTAL PHALANGES – In humans, they are the finger bones located furthest from the shoulder joint, and the toe bones located furthest from the hip. They have a corresponding location in the limbs of most other vertebrates, including the fins of whales and the wings of birds. They are also usually conical. Very often, distal phalanges are tipped with claws. In primates, they are covered by a protective nail.

Dis•til•late (d*s'tə-lāt', -l*t, d*-st*l'*t)
n.
A liquid condensed from vapor in distillation.
A purified form; an essence

Ec•to•plasm
n.
Biology. The outer portion of the continuous phase of cytoplasm of a cell, sometimes distinguishable as a somewhat rigid, gelled layer beneath the cell membrane.

ELECTRON DISPERSION SPECTROSCOPY – used to identify imperfections in the atomic-level structure of material by analysis of microscopic surfaces. A very thin slice of the material to be tested is exposed to a beam of electrons. When the electrons interact with consistent material structure, a constant fraction of electrons is transmitted back from the sample to a detector. Once a structural imperfection is encountered, the fraction of transmitted electrons changes.
E•lec•tro•pho•re•sis
n.
The migration of charged colloidal particles or molecules through a solution under the influence of an applied electric field usually provided by immersed electrodes. Also called cataphoresis.

E•mul•si•fy
v.
To make into an emulsion.

En•do•car•di•tis
n.
Inflammation of the endocardium.

ENDOCRINOLOGIST - A specially trained doctor who diagnoses diseases that affect the glands.

ENGRAVER’S PLATES – Currency printing is a highly specialized craft. The U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing prints currency on high-speed, sheet-fed rotary presses which are capable of printing over 8,000 sheets per hour. Printing plates are covered with ink and then the surface of each plate is wiped clean which allows the ink to remain in the design and letter grooves of the plates. Each sheet is then forced, under extremely heavy pressure (estimated at 20 tons), into the finely recessed lines of the printing plate to pick up the ink. The printing impression is three dimensional in effect and requires the combined handiwork of highly skilled artists, steel engravers, and plate printers. The surface of the note feels slightly raised, while the reverse side feels slightly indented. This process is called intaglio printing. Venezuela ’s currency is named for Venezuelan-born Simón Bol�*var, who liberated much of South America from Spanish rule in the 19th century and became one of Latin America's greatest heroes.

ENTOMOLOGIST – A scientist who studies insects. Insects have many kinds of interactions with humans and other forms of life on earth, so it is an important specialty within biology. Unlike many other fields however, entomologists include both persons studying insects for their own sake, and those employed by commercial concerns interested in the control of insects.

Ep•i•con•dyle
n.
A rounded projection at the end of a bone, located on or above a condyle and usually serving as a place of attachment for ligaments and tendons.

EPIPHYSEAL FUSION – The epiphyses are the end regions of the bone. The epiphyses of long bones remain separated by a growing zone of cartilage (the metaphysis) until the child reaches skeletal maturity (18 to 25 years of age), whereupon the cartilage ossifies, fusing the two together. Thus the degree of epiphyseal fusion is a good indicator of a skeleton's age.

E•piph•y•sis
n.
The end of a long bone that is originally separated from the main bone by a layer of cartilage but later becomes united to the main bone through ossification.

Escitalopram
Escitalopram is an oral drug that is used for treating depression and generalized anxiety disorder. It works by affecting neurotransmitters in the brain, the chemical messengers that nerves use to communicate with one another. Neurotransmitters are made and released by nerves and then travel to other nearby nerves where they attach to receptors on the nerves. Some neurotransmitters that are released do not bind to receptors and are taken up by the nerves that produced them. This is referred to as "reuptake."
Eth•yl•ene (ĕth'ə-lēn')
n.
A colorless flammable gas, C2H4, derived from natural gas and petroleum and used as a source of many organic compounds, in welding and cutting metals, to color citrus fruits, and as an anesthetic. Also called ethene.

FACET JOINT - The facets are the bony knobs that meet between each vertebra of the spinal column. They extend and overlap each other to form a joint between the neighboring vertebra facet joints. The facet joints give the spine its flexibility.

Fas•ci•a
n., pl. fas•ci•ae
Anatomy. A sheet or band of fibrous connective tissue enveloping,
separating, or binding together muscles, organs, and other soft
structures of the body.

FECAL FLOTATION - is a simple procedure used to screen animals for internal parasites. Most oocysts and ova are easily identified by this simple procedure. Cases presenting for gastrointestinal problems such as severe diarrhea, weight loss, or ill thrift may benefit from this parasite screening test.

Fentanyl – A narcotic analgesic used in combination with other drugs before, during, or following surgery and also for chronic pain management.

FLUORANTHENE - A white crystalline hydrocarbon C15H10, of a complex structure, found as one ingredient of the higher boiling portion of coal tar.

FORAMEN - A natural opening, usually through bone.

FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGIST – A scientist who applies physical anthropology and human osteology in a legal setting, most often in criminal cases where the victim's remains are more or less skeletonized. A forensic anthropologist can also assist in the identification of deceased individuals whose remains are decomposed, burned, mutilated or otherwise unrecognizable.

FORENSIC ENTOMOLOGY – Is the study of insects that scavenge on corpses; knowledge of their habits can yield useful information about crimes, such as an approximate time of death or whether or not a victim was alive during a fire, using facts such as what stage of the life cycle the insect/bug is in, et cetera.

Frank•in•cense
n.
An aromatic gum resin obtained from African and Asian trees of the genus Boswellia and used chiefly as incense and in perfumes.

Fran-gi-ble
A frangible bullet is one that is designed to disintegrate into tiny particles upon impact to minimize their penetration for reasons of range safety, to limit environmental impact, or to limit the danger behind the intended target. An example is the Glaser Safety Slug.

FUROSEMIDE - a 'water pill,' used to reduce the swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems, including heart or liver disease. It is also used to treat high blood pressure. It causes the kidneys to get rid of unneeded water and salt from the body into the urine.

GASTROCNEMIUS - The big calf muscle at the back of the lower leg.
Ge•lat•i•nize
v.
1. To convert into gelatin.
2. To become gelatinous.

Glenoid (′gle′nöid)
(anatomy) A smooth, shallow, socketlike depression, particularly of the skeleton.

Glu•co•cor•ti•coid
n.
Any of a group of steroid hormones, such as cortisone, that are produced by the adrenal cortex, are involved in carbohydrate, protein, and fat metabolism, and have anti-inflammatory properties.

GROUND PENETRATING RADAR - (GPR) operates by transmitting pulses of ultra high frequency radio waves (microwave electromagnetic energy) down into the ground through a transducer or antenna. The transmitted energy is reflected from various buried objects or distinct contacts between different earth materials. The antenna then receives the reflected waves and stores them in the digital control unit. Ground penetrating radar profiles are used for evaluating the location and depth of buried objects and to investigate the presence and continuity of natural subsurface conditions and features.

HALOGENS - a highly reactive chemical series, which can be harmful or lethal to biological organisms in sufficient quantities. Chlorine and iodine are both used as disinfectants for such things as drinking water, swimming pools, fresh wounds, dishes, and surfaces. They kill bacteria and other potentially harmful microorganisms, a process known as sterilization. Their reactive properties are also put to use in bleaching. Chlorine is the active ingredient of most fabric bleaches and is used in the production of most paper products.

Ha•mate (hā'māt')
adj.Anatomy.
Hooked at the tip.
Hel•min•thes
n. pl.
(Zoöl.) One of the grand divisions or branches of the animal kingdom. It is a large group including a vast number of species, most of which are parasitic. Called also Enthelminthes, Enthelmintha.
Note: The following classes are included, with others of less importance: Cestoidea (tapeworms), Trematodea (flukes, etc.), Turbellaria (planarians), Acanthocephala (thornheads), Nematoidea (roundworms, trichina, gordius), Nemertina (nemerteans). See Plathelminthes, and Nemathelminthes

He•ma•to•ma
n.
A localized swelling filled with blood resulting from a break in a blood vessel.

Hemothorax
(medicine) Accumulation of blood in the pleural cavity.

HITTITE – an ancient people in north-central Anatolia who established an empire from the 18th century BC, which reached its height in the 14th century BC.

HOUNGAN – A male Voodoo priest.

HYDROCEPHALUS – a build–up of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain, present in up to 90 percent of children with the worst form of Spina Bifida.

HYDROMORPHONE - a drug used to relieve moderate to severe pain.

HYDROXYAPATITE – The principal bone salt, Ca5(PO4)3OH, which provides the compressional strength of vertebrate bone.

HYPERPARATHYROIDISM - A condition caused by overactive parathyroid glands, which produce too much parathyroid hormone, stimulating increased levels of calcium in the blood stream. The excess calcium released by the bones leads to osteoporosis and osteomalacia (both bone-weakening diseases).

HYPERPHASIA - the phase, directly before hibernation, in which bears concentrate on consuming vast amounts of calories.
Hy•po•chlo•rite
n.
A salt or ester of hypochlorous acid.

HYPOTHALAMUS - The part of the brain that lies below the thalamus, forming the major portion of the ventral region of the diencephalon and functioning to regulate bodily temperature, certain metabolic processes, and other autonomic activities.

ILIUM - The big bone on top of the pelvis that we think of as the hip bone. The largest one of the three bones composing either lateral half of the pelvis.

In•cus
n.
An anvil-shaped bone between the malleus and the stapes in the mammalian middle ear.

INDONESIAN GAMELAN - a term for various types of orchestra played in Indonesia. It is the main element of the Indonesian traditional music. Each gamelan is slightly different from the other. The instruments in a gamelan are composed of sets of tuned bronze gongs, gong-chimes, metallophones, drums, one or more flute, bowed and plucked string instruments, and sometimes singers.

INFRAORBITAL and SUPRAORBITAL margins – bones that partly form the eye socket, or orbit.

In•ter•cos•tal
adj.
Located or occurring between the ribs.

K–BAR KNIFE – A U.S. Marine Corps standard, the fighting knife usually has a serrated edge, non–reflective black coating and a rubber no–slip grip.
The 7–inch–long, carbon steel blade is a potent weapon when handled by a well–trained trooper.

KERF MARK - A groove or notch made by a cutting tool, such as a saw or an ax.

LARVAL STAGES – A larva (plural larvae) is a juvenile form of animal with indirect development, undergoing metamorphosis (for example, insects or amphibians). The larva can look completely different from the adult form; for example, a caterpillar differs from a butterfly.

LASER SCANNING CONFOCAL MICROSCOPE – a valuable tool for obtaining high resolution images and 3-D reconstructions, it images objects through a small pinhole aperture, thereby preventing detection of all light except for that originating from a thin optical section. By collecting a series of optical sections through the thickness of the specimen, images of its three-dimensional organization can be collected, assembled, and evaluated using specialized reconstruction software.

LATERAL EPICONDYLE - the piece of bone that can be felt on the outside of the elbow.

LAUDANINE – (organic chemistry) C20H25NO4 An optically inactive alkaloid derived from alkaline mother liquors from morphine extraction; it crystallizes in orthorhombic prisms from alcohol and chloroform; the prisms melt at 167°C, and are soluble in hot alcohol, benzene, and chloroform. Also known as dl-laudanidine.

LeMAT – A Civil War repeating pistol designed by Jean Alexander Francois LeMat, a French gun designer who was also the son-in-law of a Confederate major. To increase the revolver’s military utility, LeMat built a 9 shot, .44 caliber cylinder, giving it three extra shots and more punch than the .36 caliber Colt. The LeMat revolver is most often remembered, however, for the 10th shot. LeMat put a second barrel under the normal .44 caliber barrel, around which the cylinder revolved. This second barrel was a single shot, .65 caliber 18 gauge shotgun - short, with very little range, but a nasty weapon up close, effectively a sawed off shotgun hidden in the middle of the pistol.

LORAZEPAM – A drug used for the management of anxiety disorders, or for the short–term relief of the symptoms of anxiety or anxiety associated with depressive symptoms.

LUMINOL - The basic idea of luminol is to reveal minute blood traces with a light-producing chemical reaction between several chemicals and hemoglobin, an oxygen-carrying protein in the blood. In this particular reaction, the reactants (the original molecules) have more energy than the products (the resulting molecules). The molecules get rid of the extra energy in the form of visible light photons. This process, generally known as chemiluminescence, is the same phenomenon that makes fireflies and light sticks glow. Investigators will spray a suspicious area, turn out all the lights and block the windows, and look for a bluish-green light. If there are any blood traces in the area, they will glow.

LUNATE - The second of three bones forming the proximal row of bones in the wrist.

LYSOL IC – A highly concentrated hospital disinfectant that provides virucidal, fungicidal and bactericidal protection. Effective against the AIDS virus and staph, strep and salmonella bacteria, it is used to clean, disinfect and deodorize hard, nonporous surfaces.

MALLEOLI - the two rounded protuberances on each side of the ankle, the inner formed by a projection of the tibia and the outer by a projection of the fibula.

Mal•le•us
n.
The hammer-shaped bone that is the outermost of the three small bones in the mammalian middle ear.

MANUBRIUM - the broad, upper part of the sternum or breastbone, a long, flat bone located in the center of the chest.

MASS RECOGNITION - is still under development, but biometric technology designed to identify a person using distinguishing facial traits has become one of the most promising and powerful technological developments for law enforcement. Super Bowl 2001 fans were secretly treated to a biometric scan in which video cameras tied to a temporary law-enforcement command centre digitized their faces and compared them against photographic lists of known malefactors.

MASS SPECTROMETER - a device used for mass spectrometry, an analytical technique that determines the mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio of ions. It is most generally used to find the composition of a physical sample by generating a mass spectrum representing the masses of the components of a sample. This is normally achieved by ionizing the sample and separating ions of differing masses and recording their relative abundance by measuring intensities of ion flux. A typical mass spectrometer comprises three parts: an ion source, a mass analyzer, and a detector.

Max•il•la (măk-s*l'ə)
n., pl. max•il•lae (măk-s*l'ē) or max•il•las.
Anatomy. Either of a pair of bones of the human skull fusing in the midline and forming the upper jaw.
A homologous bone of the skull in other vertebrates.
Either of two laterally moving appendages situated behind the mandibles in insects and most other arthropods.

MECLIZINE HYDROCHLORIDE– Generally used for nausea relief due to motion sickness. It is also used to control the nausea resulting from vestibular disease, a syndrome characterized by vertigo and loss of balance.

MEME - a theoretical concept, introduced in 1976 by Richard Dawkins, that refers to any unit of cultural information such as a cultural practice, idea or concept, which one mind transmits (verbally or by demonstration) to another mind. Examples might include thoughts, concepts, ideas, theories, opinions, beliefs, practices, habits, songs, dances or moods.

METACARPAL – any bone of the hand between the wrist and fingers.

METATARSALS - the five bones between the toes and the ankle.

MICTROTOMES - precision instruments designed to cut uniformly thin sections of a variety of materials for detailed microscopic examination. For light microscopy, where magnifications can reach up to 1,800x, the thickness of a section can vary between 1 and 10 microns (thin sections). For electron microscopy, where magnifications of several hundred thousands are possible, the thickness of a section is usually of the order of 10 nanometers (ultra-thin sections).

MOGO BAG – a flannel bag containing one or more magical items, it is the staple amulet of African–American hoodoo practice. The word is thought by some to be a corruption of the English word "magic" but it more likely is related to the West African word "mojuba," meaning a prayer of praise and homage. It is a "prayer in a bag," a spell you can carry. Alternative American names for the mojo bag include hand, mojo hand, conjure hand, lucky hand, conjure bag, trick bag, root bag, toby, jomo, and gris–gris bag.

MONEY PIT - The actual Money Pit was discovered by chance in 1795 on Oak Island, Nova Scotia. It has become the longest running treasure hunt in the world.

Mor•phol•o•gy
n., pl. -gies.
1. The branch of biology that deals with the form and structure of organisms without consideration of function.
2. The form and structure of an organism or one of its parts: the morphology of a cell; the morphology of vertebrates.

MYCORRHIZA - The symbiotic association of the mycelium of a fungus with the roots of certain plants, such as conifers, beeches, or orchids

Na•vic•u•lar (nə-v*k'yə-lər)
n. In both senses also called scaphoid.
A comma-shaped bone of the human wrist, located in the first row of carpals.
A concave bone of the human foot, located between the talus and the metatarsals.

NCIC – a computerized index of criminal justice information (i.e.- criminal record history information, fugitives, stolen properties, missing persons).
Nor•ep•i•neph•rine
n.
A substance, C8H11NO3, both a hormone and neurotransmitter, secreted by the adrenal medulla and the nerve endings of the sympathetic nervous system to cause vasoconstriction and increases in heart rate, blood pressure, and the sugar level of the blood.

Nu•chal
a.
[Cf. F. nucal.]
(Anat.) Of, pertaining to, or in the region of, the back, or nape, of the neck; -- applied
especially to the anterior median plate in the carapace of turtles.
Oc•cip•i•tal (ŏk-s*p'*-tl)
adj.
Of or relating to the occiput or to the occipital bone: an occipital fracture.

ODONTOLOGIST - Forensic odontology is a branch of forensic medicine that deals with the proper examination, handling and presentation of dental evidence in a court of law. The work of a forensic odontologist includes analysis of bite marks found on victims of attack, and identification of bite marks in other substances such as wood, leather and foodstuffs.

O•o•the•ca
n.
The egg case of certain insects and mollusks.

Osteogenesis im•per•fec•ta
n.
A hereditary disease marked by abnormal fragility and plasticity of bone, with deformity of long bones, a bluish discoloration of the sclerae, recurring fractures resulting from minimal trauma, and often otosclerosis. Also called brittle bones.

Os•te•o•my•e•li•tis
n.
A usually bacterial infection of bone and bone marrow in which the resulting inflammation can lead to a reduction of blood supply to the bone.

OSTEOPOROSIS - a disease of bone in which bone mineral density is reduced and bone microarchitecture is disrupted. Osteoporotic bones are susceptible to fracture.

PALADIN - A paladin is the prototypical "knight in shining armor," a hero of sterling character and courage, who rights wrongs and defends the weak and oppressed. The word comes from the Latin word palatinus ("attached to the palace").

PALEOLITHIC - the first period in the development of human technology of the Stone Age. It began with the introduction of the first stone tools by hominids such as Homo habilis (around 2,000,000 years ago) and lasted until the introduction of agriculture.

PAMIDRONATE - a medication used to treat hypercalcemia (too much calcium in the blood).

PARATHYROID - any one of four endocrine glands situated above or within the thyroid gland.

Pa•ri•e•tal
adj.
Relating to or forming the wall of a body part, organ, or cavity.

Pat•i•na
n.
A thin greenish layer, usually basic copper sulfate, that forms on copper or copper alloys, such as bronze, as a result of corrosion.

PELVIC BONE – A bony ring, interposed between the movable vertebræ of the vertebral column which it supports, and the lower limbs upon which it rests; it is stronger and more massively constructed than the wall of the cranial or thoracic cavities, and is composed of four bones: the two hip bones laterally and in front and the sacrum and coccyx behind.

Per•i•dot (pĕr'*-dŏt', -dō')
n.
A yellowish-green variety of olivine used as a gem.

PERIOSTEAL - situated around or produced external to bone. The periosteum is a fibrous sheath that covers bones. It contains the blood vessels and nerves that provide nourishment and sensation to the bone.

PEYOTE - The central and distinctive practice of the Native American Church is the ceremonial use of peyote, a psychoactive or entheogenic cactus (lophophora williamsii) regarded as a sacramental substance that has divine powers. It is often called “medicine,” and it is believed to have powerful healing ability. Peyote use among the Huichol and other tribes goes back thousands of years in Mexico, and was first documented among the Aztecs some 400 years ago. Its history in the United States beyond its native range (restricted to the Rio Grande valley), however, is much more recent.

Phen•cy•cli•dine
n.
A drug, C17H25N, used in veterinary medicine as an anesthetic and illegally as a hallucinogen; PCP.

Phe•nol•phthal•ein (fē'nōl-thăl'ēn', -thăl'ē-*n, -thā'lēn', -thā'lē-*n)
n.
A white or pale yellow crystalline powder, C20H14O4, used as an acid-base indicator, in making dyes, and formerly in medicine as a laxative. Because of its toxicity, it is no longer used in over-the-counter laxatives.

Pha•lanx (fā'lăngks', făl'ăngks')
n., pl. pha•lanx•es or pha•lan•ges (fə-lăn'jēz, fā-).
pl. phalanges. Anatomy. A bone of a finger or toe. Also called phalange.

Pinaceae
Meaning #1 : a family of Pinaceae.

PISIFORM - a small knobbly, pea-shaped wrist bone.

PNICTOGENS - elements of the Nitrogen group (a.k.a. group VA), also known as IUPAC Group 15 (formerly Group V) of the periodic table.

Pol•y•vi•nyl
adj.
Designating any of a group of polymerized thermoplastic vinyls, such as polyvinyl chloride.

Pomatomus saltatrix or blue•fish (blū'f*sh')
n. , pl.bluefish or -fish•es.
A voracious food and game fish (Pomatomus saltatrix) of temperate and tropical waters of the Atlantic and Indian oceans.
Any of various fishes that are predominantly blue, such as the pollack.

Po•rot•ic
n.
(Med.) A medicine supposed to promote the formation of callus.
Hypertosis

PREMOLARS - also known as bicuspids. The two double-pointed teeth that occur between the canines and the molars on each side of each jaw.

PRION DISEASE – Prions are infectious agents, consisting of protein and nothing else, which cause certain degenerative disorders of the central nervous system in animals and, more rarely, in humans. The known prion diseases, all fatal, are sometimes referred to as spongiform encephalopathies because they frequently cause the brain to become riddled with holes. These ills, which can brew for years (or even for decades in humans) are widespread in animals. The most common form is scrapie, found in sheep and goats. The other prion diseases of animals go by such names as transmissible mink encephalopathy, chronic wasting disease of mule deer and elk, feline spongiform encephalopathy and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. The last, often called mad cow disease, is the most worrisome.

Propylene glycol
n.
A colorless viscous hygroscopic liquid, CH3CHOHCH2OH, used in antifreeze solutions,
in hydraulic fluids, and as a solvent.

Pro•to•zo•an
n.
Any of a large group of single-celled, usually microscopic, eukaryotic organisms, such as amoebas, ciliates, flagellates, and sporozoans.

PUPAL CASINGS (or PUPARIA) – Brown or black oval structures, about 10 mm in length. Pre–adult flies spend around half their lives as pupae, and this is the stage during which the larval body becomes reorganized into an adult fly.

RADIAL TUBEROSITY - an eminence on the anterior inner surface of the radius (lower arm bone) just distal to the radial neck, where the biceps muscle attaches.

RADII - the main bones of the forearms.

RADIUS - the bone of the forearm that extends from the inside of the elbow to the thumb side of the wrist.

RANA TEMPORARIA – A Common Frog. A tailless amphibian with smooth skin. Tends to jump, not walk.

Rancocas Creek
Rancocas Creek is a tributary of the Delaware River , approximately 30 mi (48 km) long, in southwestern New Jersey in United States . It drains a rural agricultural and forested area on the eastern edge of the Pinelands north and northeast of Camden and the New Jersey suburbs of Philadelphia .

RANGERS – The 75th Ranger Regiment, also known as the United States Army Rangers, is a Special Operations Force of the United States Army Special Operations Command (USASOC), with headquarters in Fort Benning, Georgia. The Regiment is a flexible, highly trained and rapidly deployable light infantry force with specialized skills that enable it to be employed against a variety of conventional and special operations targets. Their motto is “Rangers lead the way!"

RETICULIN – A scleroprotein present in the connective tissue framework of the lymphatic tissues.

RICKETS - is a disorder involving softening and weakening of the bones, primarily caused by lack of vitamin D, calcium, or phosphate. Normally seen in children, it can also stem from nutritional causes, as in sailors at sea for long periods without access to fresh produce.

Rosea Calyx
n. a type of rosebud.

SAGITTAL SUTURE - extends from the front of the cranium to the back, down the middle of the top of the head. The two parietal bone plates meet at the sagittal suture. Sutures allow the cranial bones to move during the birth process. They act like an expansion joint, allowing the bone to enlarge evenly as the brain grows and the skull expands, resulting in a symmetrically shaped head.

SCAPHOID - A wrist bone found on the thumb side of the hand. It is approximately the size and shape of a cashew, and is slow to heal because of the poor circulation to the bone. Unfortunately, it is relatively easy to break, and is one of the most commonly fractured bones. Approximately 60% of wrist fractures are scaphoid fractures.

SCARAB (scarabaeus sacer) - a dung-eating beetle, thought of by the ancient Egyptians as a holy animal. It was used as a symbol of the sun because of its circular shape and bright golden colors. Amulets made in its shape were by far the most important in ancient Egypt, symbolically as sacred to the Egyptians as the cross is to Christians. The small magical object was believed imbued with particular protective powers that warded off evil and provided good things for the owner for this life and also for the next, particularly when sewn to mummy wrappings.

SCIARIDS - fungus gnats.

Scle•ra
n. pl. scle•ras or scle•rae
The tough fibrous tunic forming the outer envelope of the eye and covering all of the eyeball except the cornea; the white of the eye. Also called sclerotic.

SCOLIOSIS - Scoliosis is a disease, which involves a lateral curvature of the spine; that is, the spine is bent sideways. Scoliosis is incurable, but its natural course can be affected with treatments such as surgery or back braces.

SECTE ROUGE – a particular Petro voodoo cult, concerned with the violent form of the lwas power.

Se•ro•to•nin (sĕr'ə-tō'n*n, sîr'-)
n.
An organic compound, C 10 H 12 N 2 O, formed from tryptophan and found in animal and human tissue, especially the brain, blood serum, and gastric mucous membranes, and active as a neurotransmitter and in vasoconstriction, stimulation of the smooth muscles, and regulation of cyclic body processes.

SHUNT – a tube with a valve that allows cerebrospinal fluid to drain away from the brain. The valve keeps the pressure in the brain at a normal level. The shunt is surgically implanted, and stays in place for the lifetime of the person.

Somatropin growth hormone
n. (Abbr. GH)
1. A polypeptide hormone secreted by the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland that
promotes growth of the body, especially by stimulating release of somatomedin, and that
influences the metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. Also called human
growth hormone, somatotropic hormone; Also called somatotropin.
Sphecius speciosus
n.
AKA The Cicada Killer Wasp, is a large, solitary wasp. It is so named because it hunts
cicadas and provisions its nest with them. In North America it is sometimes called the Sand Hornet, although it is not a hornet, which belong to the family Vespidae.

Sphe•noid (sfē'noid')
n.
The sphenoid bone.
adj.
Wedge-shaped.
Of or relating to the sphenoid bone.

SPINA BIFIDA (“split spine” in Latin) – a neural tube defect that happens in the first month of pregnancy when the spinal column doesn’t close completely. Because of the opening in the spine, the nerves of the spinal cord may be damaged. A spinal cord that's damaged may not be able to get messages to and from the brain.

Spec•tro•pho•tom•e•ter
n.
An instrument used to determine the intensity of various wavelengths in a spectrum of light.

Sponyloepiphyseal dysplasias, or SED Dwarfism
dys•pla•sia (d*s-plā'zhə, -zhē-ə)
n.
Abnormal development or growth of tissues, organs, or cells.

SPOROCARP - a multicellular structure in which spores are formed, especially in red algae and certain fungi and slime molds.

SPRING-LOADED CAPTIVE BOLD STUNNER – A captive bolt stunning gun kills an animal and reduces it instantly unconscious without causing pain. A captive bolt gun has a steel bolt that is powered by either compressed air or a blank cartridge. The bolt is driven into the animal's brain. It has the same effect on the animal as a firearm with a live bullet. After the animal is shot the bolt retracts and is reset for the next animal. A captive bolt gun is safer than a firearm.

STELLATE – star-shaped.

STERNAL FORAMEN – (hole in breast bone): Bony defects (foramina) in the sternum are found in 6.7% of a large contemporary autopsy population. Usually solitary and located in the body of the sternum, these defects rarely occur multiply and in the manubrium. They have been found in children as young as 8 years as well as in persons of advanced age. Sternal foramina form along lines of fusion of multiple centers of ossification and are the result of incomplete fusion. They have been misinterpreted as acquired lesions, usually gunshot wounds.

Stri•a•tion
n.
The state of being striated or having striae.

Sub•cu•ta•ne•ous (s*b'kyū-tā'nē-əs)
adj.
Located or placed just beneath the skin.

SUBDURAL HEMATOMA – Tiny veins, called bridging veins, run between the outer covering (the dura) of the brain and the brain's surface. A subdural hematoma develops when these veins tear and leak blood, usually as the result of a head injury. A collection of blood then forms over the surface of the brain. In a chronic subdural collection, the problem is not discovered immediately and blood leaks from the veins slowly over time.

Subscapularis
n.
A muscle arising from the costal surface of the scapula and inserted on the lesser tubercle of the humerus.

Su•pra•or•bi•tal
adj.
Located above the orbit of the eye: the supraorbital ridge.

Syn•dac•ty•ly
n.
The condition of having two or more fused digits, as occurs normally in certain mammals and birds.

Tem•po•ro•man•dib•u•lar
adj.
Of, relating to, or formed by the temporal bone and the mandible.

TENTH SPECIAL FORCES GROUP – The 10th Special Forces Group was activated June 1952. It is assigned to the U.S. Army's Special Operations Command located at Fort Bragg, N.C. The group trains for and conducts combat, unconventional warfare, special reconnaissance, and foreign internal defense missions.

TERTIARY SYPHILIS - a late phase of the sexually transmitted disease syphilis, caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum. In tertiary syphilis, the spirochetes have continued to reproduce for years. Pockets of damage accumulate in various tissues such as the bones, skin, nervous tissue, heart, and arteries. Tertiary syphilis is less frequently seen today than in the past because of early detection and adequate treatment.

TEXTURE ANALYSIS - Dual-photonabsorptiometry (DXA) digital image analysis techniques can be used to evaluate bone mass and internal structure.

THERMAL IMAGING - (or Thermography) is a type of infrared imaging. Thermographic cameras detect radiation in the infrared range of the electromagnetic spectrum (roughly 900-10,000 nanometer) and produce images of that radiation. Since all objects at ambient temperature emit infrared radiation, thermography makes it possible to "see" one's environment with or without visible illumination. With a thermographic camera warm objects stand out well against cooler backgrounds.

Tho•rac•ic (thə-răs'*k)
adj.
Of, relating to, or situated in or near the thorax
Tho•ra•co•lum•bar
adj.
1. Of or relating to the thoracic and lumbar parts of the spinal column.
2. Of or relating to the thoracic and lumbar nerves.

TIBETAN THROAT SINGERS - Throat singing, a traditional Central Asian art, harnesses the harmonic frequencies created by the human vocal apparatus to select overtones by tuning the resonance in the mouth. The result of tuning allows the singer to create more than one pitch at the same time, with the capability of creating six pitches at once. Generally the sounds created by throat singing are low droning hums and high pitched flutelike melodies. Some styles of throat singing may be likened to a Theremin.

Tra•che•a (trā'kē-ə)
n., pl. -che•ae (-kē-ē') or -che•as.
Anatomy. A thin-walled, cartilaginous tube descending from the larynx to the bronchi and carrying air to the lungs. Also called windpipe.

TRAPEZIUM - A wrist bone that articulates with the scaphoid.

TRICHOPTERA – Caddisflies. The name Trichoptera, derived from the Greek words "trichos" meaning hair and "ptera" meaning wings, refers to the long, silky hairs that cover most of the caddisflies' body and wings.

TRIQUETRAL – a pyramid-shaped wrist bone.

Troch•le•a (trŏk'lē-ə)
n., pl. -le•ae (-lē-ē').
An anatomical structure that resembles a pulley, especially the part of the distal end of the humerus that articulates with the ulna.capitulum

TUBEROSITY - a large prominence on a bone usually serving for the attachment of muscles or ligaments.

Tol•u•ene (tŏl'yū-ēn') also tol•u•ol (-ôl', -ōl', -ŏl')
n.
A colorless flammable liquid, CH3C6H5, obtained from coal tar or petroleum and used in aviation fuel and other high-octane fuels, in dyestuffs, explosives, and as a solvent for gums and lacquers. Also called methylbenzene.

TZOMPANTLI - a structure found and depicted in many Mesoamerican Pre Columbian civilizations, consisting of a wooden rack used to display the skulls of captives and other sacrificial victims. The words "Il Tzompantli" literally mean "Wall of Skulls." At Chichén Itzá, a wall is decorated with images of hundreds of skulls meant to represent the souls of sacrificed victims and defeated enemy warriors. It also has carvings of eagles, feathered serpents and Mayan warriors. The Mayans believed that viewing this wall would show their strength and strike fear into the hearts of invading armies.

ULNAE - the bones on the little-finger side of the human forearms.

VOODOO - (a.k.a. Vodoun, Voudou, Vodun) – a West African ancestor–based spiritist–animist religious tradition. The name is traceable to an African word for "spirit.” Its roots are varied and include the Fon, Ewe, and Yoruba peoples of West Africa, from western Nigeria to eastern Ghana. Slaves brought their religion with them when they were forcibly shipped to Haiti and other islands in the West Indies.
There are two primary aspects of Voodoo:
- Rada, the Voodoo of the relatively peaceful and happy lwa (spirits).
- Petro, the Voodoo of angry, mean and nasty lwa.

XIPHOID - a small cartilaginous extension to the lower part of the sternum, which may become ossified in the adult.

X-LINKE HYPOPHOSPHATEMIA - a genetically linked electrolyte disturbance characterized by low phosphorus in the blood (hypophosphatemia) associated with high phosphate excretion in the urine (hyperphosphaturia), and symptoms of rickets (bowed or knock-kneed legs). Dental problems, particularly unexplained abscesses in primary teeth, are also a common sign of the disease.

ZYGOMATIC PROCESS – the arch of bone on each side of the face, just below the eyes.

Source: FOX
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Old 09-20-2005, 07:00 PM
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thats exactly what i was thinking.
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Old 09-21-2005, 08:23 AM
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We tend to think alike!
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Old 09-22-2005, 07:43 PM
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IF anyone has anymore anthropology terms to add to the list feel free to add them.
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Old 10-04-2005, 10:17 AM
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DISTAL PHALANGES – In humans, they are the finger bones located furthest from the shoulder joint, and the toe bones located furthest from the hip. They have a corresponding location in the limbs of most other vertebrates, including the fins of whales and the wings of birds. They are also usually conical. Very often, distal phalanges are tipped with claws. In primates, they are covered by a protective nail.
I always wondered about the existence of nails Good idea for a thread.
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Old 10-04-2005, 04:20 PM
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I always thought it was creepy how fingernails (and hair, for that matter) continued to grow after death...

Er... but that's probably another thread...
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Old 10-05-2005, 11:48 AM
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Probably. Wanna gross out the OTers?
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Old 04-17-2006, 03:36 AM
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The opening post is up to date
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Old 05-11-2006, 09:40 PM
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Another update:

Episode 1x20: The Soldier on the grave (05/10/2006):

The Code of Conduct (CoC) is the guide for the behavior of military members who are captured by hostile forces. In six brief Articles it addresses those situations and decision areas that, to some degree, all military personnel could encounter.

Article Six reads as follows: I will never forget that I am an American, fighting for freedom, responsible for my actions, and dedicated to the principles which made my country free. I will trust in my God and in the United States of America.

Cadaveric spasm - a muscle phenomenon in which some muscles of the body become stiff instantly, rather than in the usual two to eight hours normal rigor takes to develop. The reason for such rapid rigor mortis, usually, is the extreme exertion of the muscles during the act of dying, especially as can happen during a struggle.
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Old 05-12-2006, 03:37 AM
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Thanks for the update Nad! I need to read all of it again one day
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Old 05-19-2006, 01:09 AM
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Episode 1x22: The Woman In Limbo (05/17/2006)

SUBDURAL HEMATOMA – Tiny veins, called bridging veins, run between the outer covering (the dura) of the brain and the brain's surface. A subdural hematoma develops when these veins tear and leak blood, usually as the result of a head injury. A collection of blood then forms over the surface of the brain. In a chronic subdural collection, the problem is not discovered immediately and blood leaks from the veins slowly over time.

NCIC – a computerized index of criminal justice information (i.e.- criminal record history information, fugitives, stolen properties, missing persons).

ASSYRIAN – from Assyria, an ancient empire in Mesopotamia. The Assyrian kings controlled a large kingdom at three different times in history. The most powerful and best-known nation of these periods is the Neo-Assyrian kingdom, 911-612 BC.

HITTITE – an ancient people in north-central Anatolia who established an empire from the 18th century BC, which reached its height in the 14th century BC.

SPRING-LOADED CAPTIVE BOLD STUNNER – A captive bolt stunning gun kills an animal and reduces it instantly unconscious without causing pain. A captive bolt gun has a steel bolt that is powered by either compressed air or a blank cartridge. The bolt is driven into the animal's brain. It has the same effect on the animal as a firearm with a live bullet. After the animal is shot the bolt retracts and is reset for the next animal. A captive bolt gun is safer than a firearm.

MEME - a theoretical concept, introduced in 1976 by Richard Dawkins, that refers to any unit of cultural information such as a cultural practice, idea or concept, which one mind transmits (verbally or by demonstration) to another mind. Examples might include thoughts, concepts, ideas, theories, opinions, beliefs, practices, habits, songs, dances or moods.

LASER SCANNIGN CONFOCAL MICROSCOPE – a valuable tool for obtaining high resolution images and 3-D reconstructions, it images objects through a small pinhole aperture, thereby preventing detection of all light except for that originating from a thin optical section. By collecting a series of optical sections through the thickness of the specimen, images of its three-dimensional organization can be collected, assembled, and evaluated using specialized reconstruction software.

ELECTRON DISPERSION SPECTROSCOPY – used to identify imperfections in the atomic-level structure of material by analysis of microscopic surfaces. A very thin slice of the material to be tested is exposed to a beam of electrons. When the electrons interact with consistent material structure, a constant fraction of electrons is transmitted back from the sample to a detector. Once a structural imperfection is encountered, the fraction of transmitted electrons changes.
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Old 08-31-2006, 06:57 AM
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Bones 2x01: "The Titan on the Tracks"; AUGUST 30, 2006

Diarrhetic; Diarrhœtic – (Med.) Producing diarrhea, or a purging.

Casu consulto – Latin for “Accidentally on Purpose.”

laudanine – (organic chemistry) C20H25NO4 An optically inactive alkaloid derived from alkaline mother liquors from morphine extraction; it crystallizes in orthorhombic prisms from alcohol and chloroform; the prisms melt at 167°C, and are soluble in hot alcohol, benzene, and chloroform. Also known as dl-laudanidine.

reticulin – A scleroprotein present in the connective tissue framework of the lymphatic tissues.

acetic anhydride – (organic chemistry) (CH3CO)2O A liquid with a pungent odor that combines with water to form acetic acid; used as an acetylating agent.

fentanyl – A narcotic analgesic used in combination with other drugs before, during, or following surgery and also for chronic pain management.

hydroxyapatite – The principal bone salt, Ca5(PO4)3OH, which provides the compressional strength of vertebrate bone.

hypothalamus – The part of the brain that lies below the thalamus, forming the major portion of the ventral region of the diencephalon and functioning to regulate bodily temperature, certain metabolic processes, and other autonomic activities.
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Old 09-03-2006, 03:05 AM
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The Glossary has been updated
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Old 09-04-2006, 01:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by globe2912 (View Post)
The Glossary has been updated
Thanks a lot for the update Nad
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Old 09-18-2006, 05:04 AM
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scaph•oid (skăf'oid')
adj.
Shaped like a boat.

cop•tic (kŏp't*k)
adj.
Of or relating to the Copts, the Coptic Church, or the Coptic language.

sphe•noid (sfē'noid')
n.
The sphenoid bone.
adj.
Wedge-shaped.
Of or relating to the sphenoid bone.

pha•lanx (fā'lăngks', făl'ăngks')
n., pl. pha•lanx•es or pha•lan•ges (fə-lăn'jēz, fā-).
pl. phalanges. Anatomy. A bone of a finger or toe. Also called phalange.

Rosea Calyx
n. a type of rosebud.
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