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Old 11-19-2016, 08:51 PM
  #32
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First advanced review.

Comic Review: Buffy Season 11 #1 - Wicked Horror

Comic Review: Buffy Season 11 #1

By Nat Brehmer
-
November 16, 2016



I thought it was a little strange to take such a short gap between the end of season 10 and the beginning of season 11, but I’m not really ever gonna be the guy to complain about more Buffy. The reasons behind the decision make sense. Season 11 will be the shortest comic season yet, numbering only twelve issues. To take a short break before jumping into a story that’s technically smaller but larger in scope makes a lot of sense.

I will not spoil anything about the issue itself, as it doesn’t hit the stands for about another week, but I will do my best to say what I can about it. And the first thing I think I can state with some confidence is: it’s good.

This is a strong, strong opener. We pick right back up with every character, understanding that a few months have passed but also feeling like we barely left. This is clearly a season that’s going to play out like a Marvel/DC-ish event series, and I’m fine with that. Knowing that going in, I was expecting some kind of inciting incident. Rest assured, we definitely get one of those, though I won’t say exactly what it is.

It works on a lot of levels. In the most basic way, it sets up a bigger story with higher stakes. The scene itself is very dramatic and realistic, feeling somewhere between the scope of a modern-day superhero movie and a comment on the destruction those films tend to wreak.



But it also works because we haven’t seen huge, large-scope comic book-ish action since season eight. That comic was criticized a bit for the fact that they went so crazy with the fact that they weren’t limited by budget, so Buffy fought all sorts of giant creatures. Now, the comic has settled into a routine that—while it shows growth—feels very similar to the TV show.

The fact that the comic moved away from the scope of season eight does not mean that those large-scale threats are not still out there. I think the events of the issue serve as a very effective, dramatic reminder of that.

It also works because, after being so torn up inside and internally conflicted through much of season ten, the gang have found a sense of balance and normalcy in their decidedly abnormal lives. When the big thing hits, they’re all doing great for pretty much the first time. Then this event comes that shakes their world to their core, and I think the bulk of the season is going to be reactionary.

The events of this issue set off more than a ripple through Buffy’s world. It’s more of a tidal wave. Everything is going to change, and I’m excited to see what that change entails.

WICKED RATING: 8/10
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Old 11-21-2016, 02:36 PM
  #33
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New Christos Gage interview on season 11.

https://www.pastemagazine.com/articl...-slayer-s.html

Christos Gage Pits Demons and Politics Against the Scooby Gang in Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 11

Plus an Exclusive Preview of Rebekah Isaacs’ Interior Art for Issue #1

By Steve Foxe | November 21, 2016 |



While no one could rightfully accuse Buffy Summers and the “Scooby Gang” of having a small or unenthusiastic fan base, who’d have expected the canonical comic continuation of Joss Whedon’s vampire-slaying saga to persist for nearly a decade? Season Eight, which launched back in 2007, took the franchise to surprising places—superpowers!—unrestrained by television budgets. Season Nine and Season 10 continued the trend, with frequent Amazing Spider-Man co-writer Christos N. Gage and DV8: Gods & Monsters artist Rebekah Isaacs transitioning from the Angel & Faith spin-off book to the core Buffy title.



Season 11, which kicks off this week, sees Gage and Isaacs back in charge of Buffy, Spike, Willow, Xander and the rest of the beloved Sunnydale crew, now relocated to San Francisco and dealing with an openly magical—and demonic—world. To coincide with the first issue of the new season, Paste chatted with Gage to discuss the massive status quo changes in the years since the show went off the air, collaborating with Isaacs and Buffy’s own political problems to come.

Paste: It’s been 13 years since the original television show wrapped, and nearly ten since the comic continuation launched. How influenced do you remain by Sarah Michelle Gellar, Alyson Hannigan and the rest of the cast’s portrayals?

Christos Gage: We’re definitely still influenced by the cast’s portrayals. I often pull up an episode just to listen to the voices. Working with Nicky Brendan on season ten was terrific because I was able to insert more “Xander-isms” that I wouldn’t have thought of in a million years. The cast’s work is our inspiration and what we base everything on. I know Rebekah [Isaacs] looks at episodes as well, for reference on everything from body language to fashion choices.

Paste: For any lapsed fans looking to jump back in with Season 11, what’s the lowdown on Sunnydale’s finest following the events of Season 10? How much time has passed between the clash with D’Hoffryn and this first issue?

Gage: Season 11 takes place a few months after Season 10. All you really need to know to start Season 11 is that the Scoobies are living in San Francisco. Buffy and Spike are giving a real, healthy relationship a try for the first time, and are consulting with the police on supernatural crimes. Giles died and was resurrected in a 13-year-old body with all his memories. Willow is single and basically still Wil. Dawn is in college, and she and Xander are dating. They’re all together, with some semblance of happiness and stability. And, of course, in the first issue of Season 11, we pretty much blow all that up. So you can jump right in. That said, anyone who hasn’t read the comics should really pick up Dark Horse’s lovely and bargain-priced Library Editions of seasons 8 and 9. They’re gorgeous and each contains ten issues of the comics. We also have trade paperbacks out of Season 10, with Library Editions to follow soon, I hope.

Paste: Buffy continues to have a sprawling, eclectic cast. Do you have a personal darling, or a character you couldn’t wait to get your hands on? Smarmy preteen Giles might be my new favorite.

Gage: He is a lot of fun. I always love writing the side characters who appear from time to time, like Harmony, Clem and Dracula. Especially Harmony. It’s such a blast to write someone who is completely and utterly self-absorbed. And Clem is just so happy all the time, while the portrayal of Dracula that the ever-awesome Drew Goddard (who I had the great pleasure of working for on Season 1 of the Daredevil TV show) set up in Season 8 is an endless well of delight and amusement for me.

Paste: Now that Buffy and Spike are settling into a surprising domestic stability, how do you keep the romantic flames burning in their relationship without undermining their growth as a couple? Buffy isn’t exactly known for long-term happy couples…

Gage: That’s true, which is part of the reason we wanted to explore a healthy, happy relationship (at least, an attempt at one). We open with Buffy and Spike in a pretty good place. I know there have been readers who want us to turn up the heat and show more hot Slayer-on-vampire action. I wish I could say we will deliver, but the impact of events in the larger world quickly overwhelm our characters. Does that include their relationship? Wait and see… in the meantime, I am leaving an opening for the fanfic writers to corner the market on the saucy stuff. Have at it!

Paste: Recent years have seen the Buffyverse spreading across one-shots, mini-series and sibling title Angel & Faith. How self-contained is Season 11? Can we expect to see the story branching outside of your core title?

Gage: Well, there’s the companion Angel series, which tells its own tale. And as a fan of young Giles, you’ll be happy to hear that Joss himself is co-writing a miniseries about him going back to school. I know that sounds like a sitcom premise, and I suspect there will be very funny moments, but I think Joss has some surprises in store for us all.

Paste: You’ve now worked with Rebekah Isaacs on a solid chunk of Buffy’s post-show lore. What’s your collaboration like at this point? Already in the first issue, the two of you are pushing the scope of action way beyond what you could ever show on a TV budget.

Gage: For me, the collaboration is great. There’s an easy confidence that comes with working with collaborators like Dan Slott and Mike Perkins. I’m sure Rebekah is ready to strangle me because I’m so confident in her awesomeness, especially at getting across a character’s emotions and designing creatures, that I don’t hesitate to dump directions on her like, “Spike says X, but we need to see that he feels Y” or “six demons approach. Design them how you want.” It really should be illegal to do that to an artist, don’t you think? And yet I do, and she handles it brilliantly.

We’re excited to push scope and scale of the series. After getting back to focusing on the characters more in Season 10, Joss wanted to raise the stakes this time, not to the cosmic Season 8 level, but bigger than we had. So we’re trying to take full advantage of the comics medium to do just that.

Paste: Mild spoiler territory, but it looks like Buffy might be getting political in the near future. What inspired you to bring the government into Buffy’s life, and has the current political climate affected your take on that aspect of the story?

Gage: I’m sure a lot of people will read it and think we’re getting political. And to a degree it has; Joss and I are of a similar political bent. We work really far ahead (I had six issues written before Election Day, and the season’s storyline sketched out months ago). So it’s unwise to try and tie the story too directly to current events because things change so fast and then you’re irrelevant. We did talk a lot in the Season 11 summit about the general feeling of impending doom that seems to be permeating our world: environmental crisis, political and ethnic divisions, war, the refugee crisis, etc. Joss feels it especially keenly as a father and wanted to explore some of these things. There was also a feeling that the supernatural, now that the Buffyverse at large knows about its existence, had become too mainstream and commonplace, so we’re taking a sharp turn. I guess people should read it and judge for themselves.
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Old 11-30-2016, 12:04 PM
  #34
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This is a bit late.I wasn't able to get to my comic shop last week.Got there today so I finally have Buffy Season 11 # 1,"Part I of "The Spread of Their Evil."

As I mentioned elsewhere,I wasn't sure if I was going to get season 11.I was considering passing.My comic book spending is tighter now due to amount of books I follow(several of my DC books are now twice monthly) and price.So I've been shaving some books from my pull list and Buffy was one of them I was considering.

In the end I decided to follow season 11 because....

A)The shorter season

B)The premise of the season.

C)I liked season 10 minus the spuffy,something I'll never enjoy(but there was enough present in season 10 to offset that).

D)It's hard to let Buffy go(and yes I will be reading Angel and the Giles miniseries).The non season 11 things like the high school years I will be passing on.

After season 11,I will decide again if there is a season 12.

So,I will keep the rest of this short.But I liked the first issue of season 11.

The set up has a more event feel to it and feels a lot like Angel:After The Fall which was a story I really enjoyed.

I actually do like the parallels to stuff going on in the real world,something Christos Gage said was not intentional.But it does make things topical and that make this interesting.
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Old 12-05-2016, 03:21 PM
  #35
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Georges Jeanty who is returing for season 11 as a guest artist posted a pic.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BNpkitfATE9/
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Old 12-14-2016, 05:19 PM
  #36
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Season 11 March 2017 Solicitations.

http://www.bleedingcool.com/2016/12/...or-march-2017/

Angel Season 11 #3

Corinna Bechko (W), Geraldo Borges (A), Michelle Madsen (C), Scott Fischer (Cover), and Jeff Dekal (Variant cover)

On sale Mar 15
FC, 32 pages
$3.99
Ongoing

As the battle between Illyria of the past and an invading god escalates, Fred is caught in the middle while Angel tries to figure a way to prevent the foretold disaster and get them back to the future . . . safe . . . And able to save the world again.





Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 11 #5

Christos Gage (W), Georges Jeanty (P/Variant cover), Dexter Vines (I), Dan Jackson (C), and Steve Morris (Cover)

On sale Mar 22
FC, 32 pages
$3.99
Ongoing

Buffy is trying hard to keep things civil in the Safe Zone, but certain residents seem to be pushing for confrontations of any kind—and the death toll is rising. Buffy is not making any new friends. Meanwhile, Willow is doing all she can to get fellow Wiccans released from camp—and if that means magic, she has plenty to use.

• Catch “deleted scenes” on the variant covers!



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Old 12-15-2016, 06:17 AM
  #37
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Love the last artwork with that red hair girl! And the Illyira artwork is so epic
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~My top ships: Brennan/Booth, Shamy, Penny/Leonard, Buffy/Angel, Willow/Tara, Valerie/David, Kelly/Dylan, Ross/Rachel, Angela/Hodgins, Piper/Leo, Jessica/James~
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Old 12-17-2016, 06:33 AM
  #38
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Okay,I don't think any preview pages have been released so far and the issue is out on Wed.But the first review is up.There is some preview images in the review

Comic Review: Buffy Season 11 #2 - Wicked Horror

Comic Review: Buffy Season 11 #2

By Nat Brehmer
-
December 14, 2016



This is a very plot-heavy issue. Everything going on in it is centered on the fallout from the events of the season premiere. You can definitely see that this is going to be a shorter season because the events that play out in this issue would definitely have been covered over three or four issues in a previous comic book season. But I don’t think that’s necessarily a bad thing.

Everything going on in this issue is about ramping up the intensity and raising the stakes. Yes, some fans may groan because everything in it feels very familiar. There’s a heavy element of Marvel’s Civil War to what’s going on here, in that the government is forcing the registration of all magical entities living in the United States. It also reeks of the Mutant Registration Act that the X-Men are constantly being threatened with. These are not new ideas, I’ll admit. But I don’t think that means they’re not valid ideas.

Writer Christos Gage has not been shy about saying that season eleven would be addressing/directly influenced by the current political climate, which is one of severe civil unrest. I think that’s something that should be touched on by our comics and I think Buffy is a great comic to do it because it has always been about addressing those larger, real-world themes.



There’s also the fact that the whole world surrounding Buffy has completely changed over the course of the previous comic book seasons and almost all of that change has played out in the background. Yes, the new breed of vampires and issues that affect Buffy directly get dealt with all the time, but the fact that the entire world now knows about vampires and monsters is something that’s barely ever touched upon.

I think it is a great idea to finally take time to address it. I think the fact that so much hasn’t been dealt with only makes the overall plot of this season more logical. It’s an easier sell because Buffy and the gang simply assumed that the world would be welcoming toward magically inclined folks, which is never the way things seem to work on Buffy.



The thing that’s really interesting that I think separates it from similar storylines like X-Men is that in Buffy’s case the world actually tried to be tolerant. Most people were trying to be tolerant of these beings they were previously unaware of, trying to say the right thing, and then something happens that leaves people shattered and scared and they start looking for something to blame. I think it greatly addresses our recent radical political shift.

One of the things I appreciate most about the issue is that as big as it gets, it still feels like Buffy. This is big, world-changing stuff and none of it feels out of place. If anything, the issue feels like a large-scale version of the episode “Gingerbread.” As much as I enjoyed the character arcs in season 10, the stakes were relatively low. I think it was time for Buffy to try going big again, and I think this was the way to do it.

WICKED RATING: 8/10


ETA

Right after posting the review,the preview pages dropped.

http://www.comicscontinuum.com/stori.../15/buffy2.htm




Last edited by comic fan; 12-17-2016 at 06:59 AM
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Old 12-19-2016, 09:58 AM
  #39
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Buffy Free Comic Book Day 2017 announced.It's a High School Years story.

Free Comic Book Day 2017 announces full list of titles | EW.com

Free Comic Book Day 2017 announces full list of titles

Featuring Sonic the Hedgehog, 'Fresh Off the Boat,' and 'Rick and Morty,' among others

by Christian Holub



FCBD 2017 DARK HORSE ALL AGES BUFFY HIGH SCHOOL & PVZ (Kel McDonald, Paul Tobin, Yishan Li, Rachel Downing, Dark Horse Comics)

Last edited by comic fan; 12-20-2016 at 11:08 AM
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Old 12-21-2016, 05:24 PM
  #40
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Gage and Isaacs interview on Buffy Season 11 # 1-2.

Gage & Isaacs Make Buffy The Vampire Slayer's Magic Real In Season 11 - CBR



Gage & Isaacs Make Buffy The Vampire Slayer’s Magic Real In Season 11

Christos Gage and Rebekah Isaacs explain how and why they'll merge real world anxiety with the Buffyverse's magical threats in Season 11.

by Kiel Phegley in

One thing that Joss Whedon’s now-classic franchise “Buffy The Vampire Slayer” has always been known for is taking the weird and wild aspects of horror fiction and making them relatable to the lives of young adults. But that task has gotten more challenging since the series shifted to the ongoing run of Dark Horse comic books, making bigger, crazier, more unbelievable magic easier than ever to portray.

So it should come as no surprise that the just-launched “Buffy The Vampire Slayer Season 11” is putting a premium on bringing the real world back into the equation. After a number of comic seasons featured world-altering magic twists and character-morphing status quo shake-ups, the 12-issue “Season 11” is looking for a more focused, relatable adventure for Buffy and the Scoobies, all under the charge of franchise veterans Christos Gage and Rebekah Isaacs.

Of course, a giant Chinese dragon attacked San Francisco in the first issue, too.

To catch up on where the series is headed after its politically-charged opening chapter, CBR spoke with both Gage and Isaacs about the long-term plan for “Buffy Season 11.” Below the writer and artist dig into their approach to complicating Buffy’s personal life in an increasingly tense world, the humor and horror of their collaboration from the covers on down and Joss Whedon’s masterplan for 2017.

CBR: This year, Buffy is back with a new format that will deliver a year-long epic. Obviously, there was a lot of long term planning that went into the idea beforehand, but when you guys got down to brass tacks with this first issue, what was the most important thing you focused on? In other words, how did you deliver that “Season Premiere” feel in issue #1?



Christos Gage: With the first issue, we wanted to serve notice that it wasn’t going to be business as usual. That we were going to shake things up right off the bat. One way to do that was to flip the traditional script for a season. Instead of building up to a huge crisis or enemy that our heroes have to defeat, we threw that at them at the start… and they failed to stop it. It only gets worse from there. On the other hand, we wanted to try to make the issue accessible as a jumping-on point for anyone who may not be up to speed with the comics. Anything you need to know to enjoy and follow the story is in the issue.

Rebekah Isaacs: Everyone is really content and satisfied with their lives at the beginning of issue #1, so you know things are gonna get bad, real fast. The mood I was going for in the first few scenes was a Norman Rockwell painting… but with a mild dash of tentacle monsters and witchcraft.

One thing that makes this season stand out compared to previous ones is that on the surface, everything is going great for the Scooby gang for once. How did you view the team’s long-term happiness prospects?

Gage: We wanted to show that the Scoobies have grown from the events of last season… and also, of course, when things are going well in their personal lives, it’s a perfect time for the world around them to go all to hell. That was a big theme Joss wanted to explore this season: at a time when it often feels like our world is falling apart, let’s do the classic “Buffy” thing of applying a supernatural approach to that and seeing how our characters react.

Isaacs: I feel the cast has gotten a lot better at handling conflict and chaos in the last few seasons. They’re all way more mature, but that makes it more and more difficult to place obstacles in their way that they can’t easily get around with teamwork and spells and superpowers. Without giving too much away, I think the main conflict this season is so brilliant (and terrifying), because no one can magic or fight their way around it.



Of course, we’re getting hints that Buffy herself is a bit out of sorts — always her own worst enemy in some ways. I know that a big idea for Joss has always been to let her journey reflect a certain stage or feeling in the life of a young adult. How do each of you view where she’s at in Season 11? What makes her remain relatable in this crazy world?

Gage: I think she’s relatable because she is very much one of us — albeit awesomer than most of us could ever be — just trying to survive in this crazy world. Last season, her challenges were more internal, as she struggled to feel confident and make the right decisions in terms of the “Vampyr” book and her life. Now, it’s more about the world around her going crazy, and she has to figure out the best way to respond for herself, her loved ones, and the world itself. Which is something we will all have to face at some point.

Isaacs: Same here. As long as Buffy is still figuring it out as she goes along, then I don’t feel guilty for doing the same!

Then again, I’m sure there are plenty of challenges coming up for Willow, Xander, Dawn and the rest. Which cast member are you most excited to mess with this year, and why?

Gage: For me, I felt like Willow got a bit neglected last season, and I felt bad about that. We’ll be making up for it this season. We’re going to start out seeing Willow as almost a spiritual leader for a growing community of Wiccans. As we go on, there’ll be huge challenges for her both in that role as well as on a personal level. As a result, and due to the shorter season, Xander and Dawn will be pushed more to the background, though they’ll be around. It was unfortunately impossible to give everyone the room they deserve. But fans of young Giles will be glad to hear that Joss himself is co-writing a miniseries about him!

Isaacs: Spike has been pretty settled into “real” human life lately, but this season he’s being thrown into a situation that will force him to bring out his violent, feral side again. While I feel for him, it’s fun to draw!



Looking at the big picture of the book, it feels like one of the themes for this season will be how the world of magic clashes with the world of humans – particularly in a modern political sense. Why is this the right kind of story to be telling with Buffy right now?

Gage: Part of it had to do with Joss’s wish to raise the stakes, which I hope we definitely did in issue #1. As a father, he very keenly feels the current state of worry and uncertainty pervading the world… war, political division, environmental crises, etc. He wanted to explore that. Also, we felt like in the last season, the supernatural was starting to become almost too commonplace. Vampires are trendy, and everyone is now aware of the existence of fairies, demons, and other magical beings. We didn’t want the supernatural to start to feel too safe, like just part of the landscape. We’re going to see that change in a big way… a way that’s dangerous for all concerned.

Isaacs: We can’t spoil what’s coming up in issue #2, but you’ll find this season is very, very relevant to current events.

Let’s talk about Rebekah’s visuals for a minute! The big set piece for issue #1 was a “Chinese storm dragon,” which seems like not just an opportunity for big action splashes but also a different kind of cultural and art tradition to mix in with the classic vampire stuff Buffy is known for. How have you been looking at evolving the look and feel of this comic on those terms?

Gage: Working together as long as we have, I’ve gotten so confident in Rebekah that I just throw stuff at her. I have a feeling she probably wants to strangle me by now! It’s her own fault for being so good at it. I loved the storm dragon! As you said, it was a look at a different pantheon and mythology than we’ve seen, and something the show probably couldn’t have managed for budgetary reasons. All of which seem like great reasons to do it.

Isaacs: No wishes to strangle Chris here. On the contrary, the most exciting part of the work is drawing new and interesting creatures. Weren’t there some Buddhist mythology touches in Season 8, too, when they were in Tibet? The magic world is much, much more open since Season 8. Anything can happen.



One of the most fun things we’ve seen so far about Season 11 are the “deleted scenes” variant covers. How have you guys been zeroing in on the kinds of moments you want to do with these? What’s the challenge of doing one-page gag strips in this world?

Gage: They’re not all going to be gag strips, though a lot are. With the tone getting as serious as it is this season, the alternate cover seems like a good opportunity to add a bit of comic relief. And sometimes, in a season where things are going to move very fast, it’s a chance to have a quiet moment. The challenge is finding something that can be done in a couple panels, but doesn’t spoil the story inside!

Isaacs: They take a bit more time than a regular cover, surprisingly, but are less challenging to design and compose. They’re really just a twenty-third page. My favorite so far is the one of Giles shopping for school clothes with Buffy and Willow. We couldn’t have justified a whole scene of that in the interiors, but it’s a great character moment that unfortunately these characters won’t have much time for when the ******* really hits the fan.

All in all, the one thing we don’t know much about yet for this season is who the Big Bad is… or even if there is one! At this point, what can you say about the forces who are, as the title says, “Spreading Their Evil”?

Gage: One of the things we’re avoiding for most of this season is giving the characters a single figure to point to and say, “That’s the enemy.” However powerful and challenging a Big Bad may be, they come with a simple built-in solution: beat them. It’s a lot more complicated than that in Season 11. I’m not saying there won’t be a Big Bad eventually…but I’m not promising one, either.



Looking at the big picture of the book, it feels like one of the themes for this season will be how the world of magic clashes with the world of humans – particularly in a modern political sense. Why is this the right kind of story to be telling with Buffy right now?

Gage: Part of it had to do with Joss’s wish to raise the stakes, which I hope we definitely did in issue #1. As a father, he very keenly feels the current state of worry and uncertainty pervading the world… war, political division, environmental crises, etc. He wanted to explore that. Also, we felt like in the last season, the supernatural was starting to become almost too commonplace. Vampires are trendy, and everyone is now aware of the existence of fairies, demons, and other magical beings. We didn’t want the supernatural to start to feel too safe, like just part of the landscape. We’re going to see that change in a big way… a way that’s dangerous for all concerned.

Isaacs: We can’t spoil what’s coming up in issue #2, but you’ll find this season is very, very relevant to current events.

Let’s talk about Rebekah’s visuals for a minute! The big set piece for issue #1 was a “Chinese storm dragon,” which seems like not just an opportunity for big action splashes but also a different kind of cultural and art tradition to mix in with the classic vampire stuff Buffy is known for. How have you been looking at evolving the look and feel of this comic on those terms?

Gage: Working together as long as we have, I’ve gotten so confident in Rebekah that I just throw stuff at her. I have a feeling she probably wants to strangle me by now! It’s her own fault for being so good at it. I loved the storm dragon! As you said, it was a look at a different pantheon and mythology than we’ve seen, and something the show probably couldn’t have managed for budgetary reasons. All of which seem like great reasons to do it.

Isaacs: No wishes to strangle Chris here. On the contrary, the most exciting part of the work is drawing new and interesting creatures. Weren’t there some Buddhist mythology touches in Season 8, too, when they were in Tibet? The magic world is much, much more open since Season 8. Anything can happen.



One of the most fun things we’ve seen so far about Season 11 are the “deleted scenes” variant covers. How have you guys been zeroing in on the kinds of moments you want to do with these? What’s the challenge of doing one-page gag strips in this world?

Gage: They’re not all going to be gag strips, though a lot are. With the tone getting as serious as it is this season, the alternate cover seems like a good opportunity to add a bit of comic relief. And sometimes, in a season where things are going to move very fast, it’s a chance to have a quiet moment. The challenge is finding something that can be done in a couple panels, but doesn’t spoil the story inside!

Isaacs: They take a bit more time than a regular cover, surprisingly, but are less challenging to design and compose. They’re really just a twenty-third page. My favorite so far is the one of Giles shopping for school clothes with Buffy and Willow. We couldn’t have justified a whole scene of that in the interiors, but it’s a great character moment that unfortunately these characters won’t have much time for when the ******* really hits the fan.

All in all, the one thing we don’t know much about yet for this season is who the Big Bad is… or even if there is one! At this point, what can you say about the forces who are, as the title says, “Spreading Their Evil”?

Gage: One of the things we’re avoiding for most of this season is giving the characters a single figure to point to and say, “That’s the enemy.” However powerful and challenging a Big Bad may be, they come with a simple built-in solution: beat them. It’s a lot more complicated than that in Season 11. I’m not saying there won’t be a Big Bad eventually…but I’m not promising one, either.



“Buffy The Vampire Slayer Season 11” #2 is on sale now.
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Old 12-29-2016, 12:40 PM
  #41
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A little late.I actually got the issue last week but only now just posting a few thoughts on Buffy # 2.

I'm not getting into the political aspects which are a big discussion on this issue and season.Just looking at it a story,I enjoyed the issue and the setup.

This issue is dense but it sets a lot of stuff up.But I really like the idea of doing s larger scale story again like season 8 but within a shorter season.I compare it a bit to Angel:After The Fall.

As other have said,the ideas of this story is a bit like Marvel's Civil War(both comics and movie) and storylines in the X-Men.They are even doing this type of plot on Agents of Shield with the Inhumans.

But I'm curious about how this type of plot will be applied to the Buffyverse.

Enjoyed the issue as a whole.
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Old 12-30-2016, 03:11 AM
  #42
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Preview Pages for Angel S11 # 1.

EXCLUSIVE PREVIEW: Angel Season 11 #1 - Comic Book Preview - CBR

EXCLUSIVE PREVIEW: Angel Season 11 #1 (Preview)



It will take an Angel and a goddess to save the world!

Vampire Angel is tormented by a vision linking his shameful past to something very big—and very bad—that is coming. The goddess Illyria gives Angel some insight and incentive. Then she really gets involved, and Angel discovers that it might be possible to change the future by changing the past.

* Writer Corinna Bechko (Tomb Raider, Star Wars) brings you the vampire Angel in his own series!

* Featuring Fred and Illyria!












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Old 01-11-2017, 10:14 AM
  #43
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Preview pages for Buffy # 3

BUFFY & SPIKE Throw Down in BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER SEASON 11 #3

Buffy and Spike throwdown for the fate of Magical Folk in this preview of Buffy The Vampire Slayer Season 11 #3, on shelves January 25.

BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER SEASON 11 #3

Writer: Christos Gage
Artist: Rebekah Isaacs
Colorist: Dan Jackson
Cover Artist: Steve Morris
ormat: FC, 32 pages; Ongoing
Price: $3.99

With the magical folk in the US being cataloged and relocated to a “safe” place, Buffy and her friends will have to decide if they will be divided . . . Or if they will try to run. With Slayers being recruited to help police the magical folk, escaping might not be so easy.








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Old 01-12-2017, 10:34 PM
  #44
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Another Georges Jeanty pencil preview.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BPK6rzWg7tB/
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Old 01-17-2017, 11:32 AM
  #45
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CBR interview withAngel Season 11 write.

Corrina Bechko On Revealing Angel's Hidden Past In Season 11 - CBR



Corrina Bechko On Revealing Angel’s Hidden Past In Season 11

Angel is back...in time! Series writer Corrina Bechko explains the significance of his past in Season 11

by Kiel Phegley

Fans of Joss Whedon’s hip horror world centering on Buffy the Vampire Slayer have already embarked on the 12-issue saga that is “Season 11.” But even though this year’s canonical continuation of the cult TV series is shorter than seasons past, the Dark Horse world isn’t done with “Buffy” alone. This week sees the debut of “Angel Season 11” – the latest chapter in the afterlife of the Whedonverse’s leading vampire.

While previous years of the comics have seen the “Buffy” and “Angel” series (whatever form they may take) work closely together to tell a sprawling story, Season 11 sees “Angel” going solo in more ways than one.

Under the guidance of writer Corinna Bechko and artist Geraldo Borges, the series will embark on its own 12-issue journey in parallel with “Buffy Season 11.” The book takes Angel out of previous trappings like Los Angeles and London and actually out of the 21st Century as a whole. Instead, the story focuses on the goddess Illyria transporting Angel back through his own past as an aristocratic vampire…and on the path to confronting a Big Bad villain all his own.

CBR spoke with Bechko about her first foray into the Whedonverse, and got an exclusive, expanded look inside this week’s #1. Below, the writer digs into the ways in which she’ll connect her “Season 11” to all past iterations of Angel on the screen and on the page, the way the vampire with a heart will finally overcome his dark side and why historical horror fiction is the right frontier for the future of the franchise.



CBR: Corinna, comic fans will know a lot of your work both at Dark Horse and across the business, but since the Whedonverse is such a unique and specific story space, I wanted to start with your own experience there as a fan. What’s your background as a Buffy/Angel follower? How much of a crash course did you have to put yourself through when you got the gig?

Corinna Bechko: I immediately read every “Buffy” and “Angel” comic Dark Horse had ever produced, and set about watching “Angel” in order from the start. I needed everything to be fresh in my mind, and the result was that Angel’s world seemed very full and multi-layered to me by the time I was done. It’s funny how immersing yourself in something can alter your feel for it in contrast to what you half-remember from impressions gathered years earlier.

Of course, this world is also an idiosyncratic one – the Buffy books like all of Joss’ work have a very specific tone to them. What’s it been like balancing your own writing style with the voice of these shows/comics as you’ve gotten underway?

When I write for myself, it’s a very different experience compared to working in someone else’s universe. In a situation like this, my job is to erase myself as much as possible and to not impose my personal style too much. Of course, I can’t help but be me, but I try to capture the voice and tone of the original as closely as possible while still bringing something new to it.



At his core, Angel has always been a character fighting against his darker impulses, and that idea has really taken on new dimensions since the Dark Horse series started up. How do you hope to explore this internal dynamic over the course of “Season 11”?

I think that Angel is a complex enough character that his fight has become something nuanced. He doesn’t have to like the dark things he’s done, but he can and does learn from them, and then he often turns that knowledge to good advantage. Over the course of this season, I hope he learns that he can trust himself more and that even some of his worst impulses can be made to bear fruit that benefits the light instead of the darkness.

From what I’ve seen, artist Geraldo Borges seems to not just be working to provide a strong likeness for the characters fans already know, but it feels that as a storyteller he’s working on some unique page compositions. What’s your experience working with him so far, and what are you trying to tailor to his style in your scripts?

I’m so lucky to be working with Geraldo! His art really captures both the energy and the pathos of Angel’s character in a much more holistic way than by simply producing his likeness. I will admit that I threw some rather hallucinogenic sequences his way and was thrilled to see how beautifully wild and otherworldly they turned out.

Getting into the story, we know that this series involves time travel to Angel’s own past – a period of Buffy history that’s been talked about a lot but rarely seen. What’s the biggest draw for you in writing in this period both from a history standpoint and for what it says about Angel as a character?

I like writing stories set in the past since that often involves a lot of fun research, but in this case, it requires not only delving into real-world facts, but a close study of the history portrayed in the shows and comics. I do think I have it pretty easy because the real challenge is for the artist who has to do a lot of extra work in order to get the clothes, food, ships, houses, etc. correct. Hopefully, the end product will result in Angel getting to know himself a bit better. Angel often has a harder time forgiving himself than he does anyone else.



We know that in the main “Buffy” book, the team is working with the “short season” format (at least compared to previous seasons) of 12 issues. Will you run take a similar approach, or are you structuring this run differently?

Season 11 will have 12 issues in it, portioned into three natural arcs.

One big tease for the story is that Angel is investigating a potential future Big Bad. What can you say about the nature of this threat and any wider connection it will have with what’s going on “Buffy Season 11”?

By design, there won’t be any crossover between “Buffy Season 11” and “Angel Season 11.” Both will be complete unto themselves, so the reader can enjoy them in any order they like. As to the threat, it’s something very unique to Angel’s situation, so only he can solve the riddle and keep the world safe from a potentially devastating future.

Ultimately, what’s the aspect of this series you find the most rewarding creatively? And what about working with this character in this world is most challenging?

It is always enjoyable to delve into different historical contexts, and here I get to do it not once, but several times. It’s also a challenge though because Angel has such a complex and lengthy history. It’s important to get all the little details correct because he deserves no less from me!



“Angel Season 11” #1 arrives this Wednesday from Dark Horse Comics.
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